Posts tagged “white balance

Quit Using Auto White Balance

White Balance Fixed 50mm, f/1.4, 1/160s

Ever since taking Raul Touzon’s workshop I almost never shoot using auto white balance (AWB).  The camera rarely gets the white balance correct when it guesses, and the photos from a single shoot are often inconsistent in color when they are shot with AWB.  If they are going to be “wrong” when AWB is used, you might as well guess wrong yourself by choosing one of the manual white balance modes — at least the images will be consistent with each other.

Ideally one would shoot an image of a gray card (or a similar type of product) which has a known color and use it either to set a custom white balance in the camera or to sample it in software to do an automatic adjustment.  If I don’t use a gray card, I pick a WB mode (my default is “daylight”) and shoot everything with that.  In Lightroom I either sample a white point to fix up the WB or I adjust it to taste (I might even want to make it wacky here and there).

The shot above was snapped in the kitchen while I was testing my newly-repaired camper.  Canon had changed all my default settings of course and I don’t even remember what WB was set in the camera.  No matter, I simply used the WB eye dropper to sample one of the white polka dots on my daughter’s dress.  The image above is the result — straight out of the camera except for the white balance.

White Balance Settings In Lightroom

Original image:

Original Image

Advertisements

Boston Skyline…Blue Hour

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/7116298547/in/photostream

Boston Skyline At Blue Hour 23mm, f/8, 6 exp, ISO 100

Last weekend, after spending the day touring Boston, I walked across the pedestrian bridge (near the left side of the above image) next to Seaport Blvd which connects downtown to the old seaport district.  The bridge is part of the South Bay Harbor Trail.  I stopped for dinner and waited for the sun to set behind the city.  As I neared this photo spot I found that four photographers were already sitting there — tripods and cameras already set up.  I walked toward them and without a word stopped 10′ in front of them and pretended to set up my tripod.  Silence.  After a few seconds I turned and said I was just kidding and relieved laughter set in.  I asked if it was OK to set up just behind them and they were nice enough to extend an offer to make room in the middle of them if I wanted (I just set up behind and above them).

My intent was to bracket a bunch of exposures as it got darker using f/22 to get a starburst effect.  I switched to f/8 because (1) I really wasn’t getting much of that effect, (2) f/8 is good and sharp, and (3) my exposures were getting longer than 30 seconds and I was too lazy to start timing the exposures manually even though I was using a remote 🙂  White balance was set to daylight.  That’s somewhat arbitrary since I always shoot in RAW but it helps keep things consistent when viewed in the LCD.  I included a couple of straight-out-of-the-camera exposures below so you can see a sample of what I was working with.

On my flight home I plugged six exposures into Nik HDR Efex Pro.  My personal default is to use the realistic-subtle preset as a starting point 99% of the time and I tweak a bit in Nik.  Tweaking and saving complete, I took the Nik output into Photoshop along with a couple of the darker exposures and masked in a few spots which were still over-exposed after the HDR junk.  I toned down the colors in the water and burned the sidewalk darker a bit (more on the dodging and burning below).  Relative to colors, I did want an “HDR look” to this image but I sometimes find the reflections and colors on the water to be a bit overdone for my taste in these skyline shots.  I also dropped the overall saturation by 20 points to bring it back to realistic colors as tools like Nik HDR Efex Pro and Photomatix tend to saturate everything a lot.

Finally, since the perspective wasn’t too bad I decided to fix it by stretching out the top corners a bit and aligning the buildings with rulers to make them more upright on the edges (the SOOC images above do not have that correction).  If you do too big of an edit like this it can degrade the image but it’s fine for this one.  The final image turned out crisp and sharp at high resolution.

This screenshot shows my dodging and burning layer.  A trick I learned watching a Joe Brady video (something about Photoshop for landscapes sponsored by Xrite) is to create a new layer, fill it with 50% gray, then dodge and burn on that with black/white.  There’s no real need for that but the layer gives you a visual to show where you’re doing your adjustments.


St. Regis Hotel, Kauai

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6888363289/in/photostream/

St. Regis Hotel, Kauai, Hawaii 17mm, f/16, ISO 200, 8 exposures

I’m posting another HDR that I processed in my Photomatix vs Nik HDR Efex Pro evaluation war.  The subject here is the lobby of the St. Regis Hotel on the Hawaiian island of Kauai.  There was a multi-level water feature (a bit of which you see in this image) which provided all sorts of reflections and begged to be turned into some HDRs.  I didn’t have a tripod with me so I simply plopped the camera down on a ledge and fired of 9 bracket exposures in several locations.  This limited my composition choices but I was able to get the main thing I was after — the reflections in the water.  The hotel is situated in a beautiful spot on the island and commands a gorgeous view the mountains across a small bay.  If I’d had a tripod I would have taken shots from other positions to include a nice view of the ocean and mountains through the windows.

In this case Photomatix was dramatically better for quickly coming up with a result I liked.  The photo above is almost straight out of Photomatix — I only added some clarity/sharpening/noise reduction after that.  Nik gave some interesting results but did a lousy job keeping the clouds outside from being blown out.  Whenever I used the more realistic presets (realistic HDRs are generally my preference) the view out the windows was completely blown out.  No doubt I could have figured out how to get an acceptable result but it was taking a lot of time to begin to match what I got out of the Photomatix effort.

You’ll note the large shift in color cast across the image.  This was due to the prominence of daylight through the windows on the left side versus the interior tungsten lighting on the right.  It bothered me at first but it’s more realistic this way so I decided to leave the color as-is.


Rising Sun Reprise

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6220970115/in/photostream

Rising Sun Reprise 20mm, f/16, 1/60, ISO 200

I don’t ever get tired of beautiful sunrises…like this one I recently witnessed on the beach in Port Aransas, TX.

I used two versions of the same exposure to create the image above.  One version used daylight white balance while the other used (nearly) a tungsten white balance.  A gradient mask blended the two, keeping the golden light in the lower portion of the frame and gradually transitioning to the blue sky above.  Four or five curves layers were used to touch up portions of the image and create a vignette.  Some minor cloning/healing was done to get rid of some birds zipping across the screen and a few other tiny elements.


Relaxing at the Hyatt Lost Pines

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5528337946/

Pine Table, Hyatt Lost Pines

On a whim last weekend, my wife and I went to stay at a nearby resort called the Hyatt Lost Pines.  It’s a great place set on 405 acres along the Colorado River near Bastrop, TX.  Our goal was purely to get some relaxation time and we accomplished that in spades.  The rough schedule was eat, read, nap, snack, walk, read…then repeat it all again.  We had a thoroughly enjoyable time.

On a side note, many people who haven’t ever been to Texas think only of plains and tumbleweed (that pretty much sums up my picture of Texas when I lived in Illinois).  However, the geography of Texas is quite varied and the eastern portion — starting around the location of this resort just east of Austin — is full of tall pine trees.  Bastrop has dense areas of pines and this continues through much of the eastern part of the state.  I’ll leave it to the reader to research where the “Lost” reference in the resort’s name originates but now you know why the “Pines” reference is applicable.

I managed a few pictures early Sunday morning.  Normally on a trip like this I make it a point not to “do photography”.  However, since the goal was to do whatever we found relaxing, I did spend about 45 minutes taking pictures early Sunday morning.  There were many interesting things to photograph in the halls and main lobby but there were a surprising number of people milling about at 6am so I was limited somewhat.

The photo at the top of the post shows a table which was made from the trunk of one of six large pines which were removed from the property.  It was a nice centerpiece for the main lobby and had a finish with the potential to provide some great reflected images.  It wasn’t meant to be though as I didn’t find any pleasing compositions at the correct angles to make use of the mirror-like properties of the table.  I tonemapped six exposures in photomatix then masked in pieces from the original exposures.  One tricky thing about this image was controlling the white balance because the room was heavily tungsten-lit.  I kept a lot of that warmth but found that each exposure had a bit of a different color cast and had to be individually adjusted in order to match the tonemapped layer for masking.  I ran a copy of the nearly-finished image through Topaz Adjust and included that at about 60% opacity.  Finally I used two curves adjustment layers to tweak parts of the image and selectively used Noiseware for noise reduction in parts of the frame.

This picture below of the main lobby was processed in much the same way as the above image.  Note the light fixture hanging from the ceiling.  It was also made from one of the pines on the property.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5527761235/

Lobby, Hyatt Lost Pines

The final image is a panorama stitched from 10 frames.  Due to the way I shot the frames I was left with a piece of sky which had no pixels and thus I either needed to crop the image accordingly or clone in some sky.  I chose the cloning route and it turned out reasonably…I’m not overly skilled with the cloning tool.  I increased the exposure of the buildings with an adjustment layer and mask.  Then I increased the tonal range of the sky with a curves adjustment layer and mask.  “Increased the tonal range of the sky” makes me sound really smart but I have to admit that I got that from David Nightingale’s tutorial on curves (see here: http://www.chromasia.com/tutorials/online/curves/).  This really helped to sky out a lot.  I added some noise reduction here and there and voila…a panorama of the main lobby area of the resort.  It’s nothing too exciting but it was good shooting and post-processing practice.  It really has to be viewed large to appreciate it (click on the image to view on flickr).

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5527722545/

Riversong Lawn, Hyatt Lost Pines