Posts tagged “wave

Missing The Beach Now…

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Sharkfest, Padre Island National Seashore, Texas 250mm, f/5.6, 1/1000s

I’ve gotten over my thing about missing the snow and am now thinking about getting back to the Texas coast.  My 7-year old son brings it up constantly so we’re just going to have to set a date and do it.  The shot above was taken on our last big trip which was during Sharkfest at Padre Island National Seashore.  When we scheduled our trip we weren’t aware of Sharkfest and on arrival were very surprised by the crowds.  This 63-mile stretch of beach has one way in and out (via land) as is mostly limited to 4×4 vehicles so it’s generally rather empty.  Of course “crowded” is a relative thing and even with 10x the normal crowd there were still plenty of places along the seashore to fish and play in the water without crowding anyone out.  Normally you can pick a place where you have at *least* 1/2 mile between you and your nearest neighbor.  We had to settle for 1/8 – 1/4 mile this trip (once we made it 30 or 40 miles)…first-world problems.  Unfortunately we saw no sharks being caught.  On our “normal” trips we often see them and thought that with all these shark fishermen we’d see several.  No luck.

For those of you not familiar with shark fishing in the surf, here’s the very rough description of how it works.  Gear consists of short-ish, stiff rods with reels capable of holding hundreds of yards of approximately 100# test line.  At the terminal end there are leader rigs made out of materials ranging from 400# test monofilament to stainless steel cable.  Hanging from those are huge hooks (the size of your hand).  For bait something like a big chunk (even half) of a jack crevalle is used.  Once the rig is ready, the bait is generally paddled out with a kayak and placed beyond the third sand bar.  Then you wait, and wait, and wait.  When you get a decent sized shark on the line the fight often lasts well over an hour.  It’s pretty amazing to watch.  On a side note, it’s extremely interesting to witness the various vehicular rigs that people come up with for their shark fishing — giant platforms on top of trucks, etc.  If I’d known how unsuccessful our fishing was going to be on this trip I might have just spent time photographing the shark rigs.

I processed the image to make it appear a bit like an old print from film.  Kept the colors reasonably saturated (via the vibrance slider in Lightroom) and made the image warm like prints in the “old” days.  In Lightroom I added grain to taste.  I rarely use additional grain in images but really like it for this beach scene and if it weren’t for the vehicles it could pass for a pic from the ’70s.  I wasn’t “into” photography in my film days so I can’t wax nostalgic about this film or that film or tell you that I mimicked a certain film.  I bought whatever was cheap.

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Searching

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Searching 90mm, f/8, 1/320s, ISO 200

I posted this picture a long time back in a post about candid shots but I decided to re-post since it’s one of my favorites.  We were visiting friends in Rockport, TX and my son spent much of his time picking up little things on the waterfront.  As the sun headed toward the horizon one afternoon I spotted him intently searching the beach again and grabbed this shot.

What have I come to like about this one?  For starters, parents just like pictures of their kids. Second, he has that cute little look of concentration on his face.  Third, from a photographic standpoint I like that there’s just enough of his face showing to include him personally in the picture as opposed to some faceless “subject” (umm, yeah…I planned that…sure).  Finally the light and surroundings are just nice IMO.  As always, there are a few things I’d change if I were planning/posing this but I won’t dwell on those 🙂

I processed this picture differently this time.  I first cloned out a few things (a piece of plastic on the shore, a pole in the water, and a tiny clump of grass).  I then used several curves layers to selectively adjust areas of the shot and to add some vignette.  These layers were in luminosity mode since I wanted to pretty much leave the colors (which were very warm due to the setting sun) intact.  In Lightroom I did a few more minor tweaks with clarity and very specific exposure adjustments.


Strolling on the Beach

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Strolling On The Beach 50mm, f/2, 1/4000s, ISO 100

I was very surprised to find that one of my (not-so-freshly-pressed) posts was featured on WordPress Freshly Pressed. I started thinking about what post I should follow up with to hopefully meet the expectations of any new followers, etc.  I’m humble enough to realize that I’ve got nothing but photographs that *I* like — and hopefully others will like many of them.  What’s the Ansel Adams quote?  Something like “There no rules for good photographs, only good photographs”.  And of course “good” is defined by personal taste.  So…I’m just posting the next picture I had already planned to post in hopes that others like it too 🙂

On a recent trip to the Texas coast I was setting up for some bokeh shots with the 50mm f/1.4 and noticed this couple approaching.  I quickly focused on the sand and recomposed to catch them as they passed in front of the camera.  I said a quick ‘hello’ but otherwise pretended to ignore them and clicked off a couple of shots as they were in the frame.

My camera was already at what I considered a good aperture for this situation — f/2.  From experience I knew that anything larger and the background would be too blurred to provide enough detail to give a sense of where the shot was taken.  I had already experimented with some f/1.4 shots taken at a very close distance from the subject and the background was completely lost.  For all you could tell, I was in a bright room inside my house as opposed to the beach.  Sometimes that’s a nice effect but when I’m at the beach I typically want to show, or at the very least hint strongly, that I’m at the beach.

I knew my focus wouldn’t be perfect.  With such a shallow depth of field it usually doesn’t work to recompose your image since you end up swinging the whole plane of focus away from the subject [see below for a short, lame-ish explanation of that].  I had no time to worry about that nor did I care for this shot since I didn’t really want to capture any detail of the couple — I was going for the overall scene of “some couple” walking on the beach.  With the blown-out highlights and backlighting a precise point of focus wasn’t going to matter much anyway.  I’m not wild about the composition but again, this was a hurried, serendipitous shot.  The almost-opaque frame around the image was something I added while experimenting with OnOne Software’s Photoframe.  I’m not sure if I like it but I’m considering this one “done”.

About those depth of field issues when recomposing a shot…When you focus your camera on a particular point, imagine a plane that is perpendicular to line between your lens and subject.  Everything on that plane (including everything near the plane within the range of your chosen depth of field) will be in focus.  Taking that further, if you focus on a subject 10 feet away it will obviously be in focus, but so will anything on the flat plane (NOT arc) which goes left and right from that point.  [Here’s an illustration — not sure how helpful]  When you focus and then rotate the camera (recompose) that whole plane moves.  If you have a large depth of field (ie small aperture and/or fairly large distance to the focus point) that may not matter because the subject remains within the in-focus region even when you rotate the plane.  If the depth of field is very narrow there’s a good chance that you end up moving the subject out of the in-focus region (actually you move the plane of focus away from the subject as you rotate it).  I’ve seen a great illustration of this somewhere…I’m not able to find it with a couple quick internet searches though.


Rising Sun Reprise

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Rising Sun Reprise 20mm, f/16, 1/60, ISO 200

I don’t ever get tired of beautiful sunrises…like this one I recently witnessed on the beach in Port Aransas, TX.

I used two versions of the same exposure to create the image above.  One version used daylight white balance while the other used (nearly) a tungsten white balance.  A gradient mask blended the two, keeping the golden light in the lower portion of the frame and gradually transitioning to the blue sky above.  Four or five curves layers were used to touch up portions of the image and create a vignette.  Some minor cloning/healing was done to get rid of some birds zipping across the screen and a few other tiny elements.


The Rising Sun

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The Rising Sun 250mm, f/11, 1/90s, 200 ISO

As we were headed down Padre Island National Seashore to fish early Saturday morning, my older son and I were intently looking for bait fish activity, holes/cuts in the sandbars, etc. with the intent to find the best fishing spot — didn’t even notice the sun.  My seven-year old piped up in a matter-of-fact voice, “Hey, Dad…you’re going to want to get a picture of this.”  He’s in tune with my photography habit.

I hopped out of the truck and snapped off a few pictures.  It’s amazing how quickly the sun rises in the sky at this point in the day.


Hitting the Beach Again

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Sunrise at the Beach 17mm, f/4, 1/2000, ISO 400

Our family was supposed to spend last weekend in Rockport, TX but were unable to go to at the last minute due to medical reasons.  As a consolation I’m taking a few of the kids to the beach this weekend.  The shot above was taken on our last trip.  We had just watched the sunrise and my daughter shed her shoes and went wading. On a whim I got down low and took a variety of shots.  I wanted bokeh for the artsy look, yet enough detail to still see my daughter and the pattern in her dress.  Turns out that the widest aperture on my Canon 17-40mm (f/4) just did the trick.  I made a quick attempt at cloning the letters out of the shoes but it was soon clear that it would take a lot of work to make it look realistic…above my skill level.

This was the second shot I took (out of maybe 50).  In the subsequent images I framed the shot in all manner of ways — no sun or reflection from the sun, put the sun at the 1/3 point in the frame, showed my daughter completely, etc.  I like this one best.  In particular, I like the leaning subject (partially due to taking a step and partially due to the distorted perspective of the wide-angle lens) and the motion implied here.  I also like the extreme highlight in the left corner fading into the darker sky on the right.


Beach Silhouette, Port Aransas, TX

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Beach Silhouette, Port Aransas, TX 40mm, f/16, 1/45s, ISO 100

My daughter and I watched the birds and the sunrise last Saturday on the beach in Port Aransas, TX.  The weather was perfect and the Gulf was the calmest I’ve ever seen it.  While I was playing around with photo stuff, my daughter waded out.  I told her to freeze for some silhouettes and captured many photos like the one above.   I underexposed a bit to be sure to produce a dark silhouette — the goal being to avoid any detail in the subject of course.  Processing consisted of basic adjustments in Lightroom, including some purposely heavy contrast/clarity.  I debated whether to clone out the birds streaking across the frame…I obviously elected to leave them in.  There were a lot of interesting looks I could have gone for in this image and I had trouble deciding what I liked best.

One consideration in shots like this is the height of the camera.  Low to the ground results in a lot more sky as opposed to beach and water.  It also places the silhouette mostly against the sky which is generally nice IMO.  Camera placement high off the ground — say standing height — gives more water and beach, plus a longer reflection/shadow of the subject on the water.  There’s no “right” choice.  In a beach situation I prefer to show more water in the shot but you have to be careful about having the horizon cut through the subject’s head and things like that if you place the camera too high (see image below — it’s OK, but not my preference).  I think the shot above strikes a reasonable balance.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6096047753/in/photostream/

Silhouette From Higher Angle 17mm, f/16, 1/60s, ISO 100

Later I played around with flash in the mid-day sun while taking pictures of the kids playing on the beach.  I’ll post some of those soon.


Happy Ever After

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Last month some of my family attended the wedding of my niece Jessica in Seattle.  We would love to take the whole family to events like that but it’s just not practical in our case.  The weather was what one might expect in Seattle — highs around 50 and wet.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720214321/in/photostream

Cold, Wet, Raining

I was asked to do some photography during the times when the paid photographer wasn’t around — rehearsal, early wedding morning — and grab a few extra pics at the reception.  I had just acquired a Canon 5D Mark ii the day before we traveled and I got to try out its capabilities over the weekend.  It has amazing low-light performance and I took full advantage of that.

Here are some pics from the weekend (here’s a link to one I already posted of the rings resting in the flowers).  Some are just OK from a technical standpoint but are personally meaningful or interesting to our family.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720765354/in/photostream/

Girls Going Out

The shot below was meant to focus on the ring (and it does) but it isn’t the greatest shot.  However, I still like the general feel of it — soft light, very shallow depth of field so I included it.  It was taken in passing as I wasn’t focused on taking pictures at that point.  I’d love to have that opportunity again though.  I’d get the ring hand fully in the shot, shoot from slightly higher to entirely fill the background with Jessica’s to-do list on the poster board while keeping the nail polish bottle fully in the frame as in this shot.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720221617/in/photostream/

Early Wedding Prep

Some pics from the rehearsal:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720260405/in/photostream/

Can You Spot The Happy Bride-To-Be?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720785930/in/photostream/

Parents and Grandparents of the Bride

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720228863/in/photostream/

Think Dad's Nervous Already?

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Final Instructions

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Coaching For The Big Kiss

The wedding coordinator was concerned that the main photog wouldn’t arrive at the house early enough to get pictures of the miscellany like the rings, flower, shoes, etc. so she asked me to get some shots.  Here are a few I came away with besides the ring shot:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720809690/in/photostream/

Wedding "Stuff"

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720809396/in/photostream/

Wedding Bouquets

Pre-wedding pictures in church:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720818074/in/photostream/

Group Photos...Look At The Camera

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Group Photo

After the ceremony the wedding coordinator again commandeered me for a photo assignment.  The hired photog was covering the bride and groom’s trip through the receiving line from a vantage point near the church doors.  I was asked to cover near the end of the line and I’m glad I did — look at how happy they are!

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Just Married!!!

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Off To The Reception

During the reception I didn’t capture all that many shots but here are a few.  Light was challenging in the reception hall.  Bouncing flash was not that great (note the black ceilings) and I didn’t have 3 remote flashes on stands like the hired photog did.  I still like the shots even with some of the shadows.  I take comfort in knowing that there wasn’t a whole lot to be done without setting up extra lighting myself.  I just kept a diffuser on the flash and pointed the flash either up and slightly forward or up and slightly behind me.  As the night was winding down, Jessica asked me to take a picture of her with the bridesmaids up near the dance floor.  I like how the light ended up just fine with the exception of how everyone’s hair disappears into the background.  I didn’t have a second light to overcome that.   When we walked to the front and lined up everyone and their brother got cameras out and started firing.  Getting all the girls to look at me rather than the other cameras was a bit like herding cats.  None of the shots had everyone looking normal so I just picked the best of the bunch.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720830864/in/photostream/

Bride and Bridesmaids Impromptu

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720837158/in/photostream/

Toast

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My In-laws On The Dance Floor

A candid of my beautiful wife.  When she finds out her picture is here I’ll probably be in trouble.  She never reads my posts so please — none of you go telling her.  She never needs to know 🙂

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720287605/in/photostream/

My Beautiful Wife

The main photog had already left the reception when Jessica and Jonathan were making their exit so once again the coordinator asked me to take shots.  I had the 50mm lens on and there was no time to fetch my 24-70 or really test out the flash to adjust compensation.  I’d prefer a little different framing but I was zoomed out (with my feet) as far back as I could get and I wanted to catch some of the flag waving too.  I got off 4 frames as they walked out and they capture the moment just fine.  There was very heavy tungsten lighting in this little hallway.  My flash was gel’ed with a 1/4 CTO and I could get away with cooling the color temperature more but I decided not to eliminate it completely.  It’s a dilemma I often struggle with — Whether to keep some of that uncorrected color in certain shots.  It can be a nice effect sometimes.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720845040/in/photostream/

Off To Married Life!