Posts tagged “travel

Kauai Silhouette

Image

I was experimenting with silhouettes early one morning in Kauai, HI.  The camera was triggered with a wireless shutter release (was thankful I didn’t have to scramble back and forth through the sand and rocks using the self-timer).  I’m sure that someone thinks that there’s only one right way to shoot silhouettes but my preference is to error on the side of slightly overexposing relative to a completely black silhouette.  This varies based on the background but I want to make sure to get enough detail in the non-silhouetted portions of the photo.  Of course I could composite multiple exposures but I find it simpler to use Lightroom and/or Photoshop to reduce the exposure in the appropriate areas to get a complete silhouette if that’s what I’m after.  Often there’s no need for this extra work though — I usually can get I what I want in-camera (I did with this one).  Shooting brackets isn’t a bad idea either if you’re unsure.  The textures were added via OnOne Perfect Photo Suite.


The First Starbucks

On a recent trip to Seattle my daughters and I paid a visit to the first Starbucks.  I’m not usually very interested in something like this but thought, “Hey, we were right here so we might as well do it.”.  While the place isn’t that interesting or unique when viewed as just bricks and mortar it becomes a bit more when you think of what Starbucks has become.  This location also operates in a different manner than your typical Starbucks — and that gives the place some charm.  Upon entering the door an employee welcomes you, inquires where you are from, and directs you to the next available person to take your order.  Once your order is taken, your cup is tossed across the room to the barista.  We witnessed a couple of misses…maybe they were rookies.  They were all having fun though.

Of course I had to take a few pictures.  Using my 50mm @ f/1.4, I quickly figured out an exposure and fired away.  There were a lot of people so I limited my shots a bit.  For the image at the top my hope was to frame the counter, barista, the neon “Espresso…Cappuccino” sign, and Starbucks sign such that they were all completely readable but I never quite got it.  Unlike some photographers, I’m not willing to sit there in everyone’s way, holding up the crowd, etc. just for my shot…just not that important to me.  I could have waited for an opportunity but when I’m hanging with non-photographers (especially family) I try not to push their patience *too* much by spending all day taking pictures.

I processed the image at the top with the intent to make it look rather vintage and I added some grain to top it off.  The rest were straightforward edits — basic tweaks.

You ordered HOW many shots?!?!


Seattle Skyline Snapshot

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6861448692/in/photostream

Moody Skies In Seattle 50mm, f/1.4, 1/4000s, ISO 200 – Click to view larger on Flickr

“If you own a house which faces west on an island in the Indian Ocean and your youngest sibling is left-handed and your primary vehicle is white, then subtract line 21 from line 13, multiply by 0.285, subtract your latitude and longitude and enter the result on line 85.”  What’s that got to do with anything?  I just did my income taxes and it seems like half the directions are as nonsensical as the one above.  So, I’m just venting…our tax code is too complex and MESSED UP.  It doesn’t matter what political party affiliation you claim, whether you think the system is fair or unfair, or you think the rich should pay more or less — I don’t see how anyone could disagree that it’s a mess.  Solutions?  I don’t get into those kinds of debates online 🙂

In a previous post I showed a bokeh panorama (or “bokehrama”) from the same place the above picture was taken.  The one above was a quick snapshot as we packed up to get out of the rain.  I hadn’t planned on doing much with it but as I continued to see it among my photos it grew on me — I like the overall gloomy mood contrasted with the random colors of the skyscraper windows for example.  Having a bit of detail and drama in the clouds helps too and I don’t think I would like it as much if the skies had been a flat gray.

This image is from a single frame captured with a 50mm lens.  You may note the odd settings used — not typical for a landscape shot.  The fact of the matter is that I had just used roughly the same settings for the panorama I linked to above.  For this skyline image I sped up the shutter one stop with a flick of the dial (didn’t need quite the length of exposure that I needed for my daughter’s dark skin) and snapped this quickly so we could get going.  Something like f/8 would’ve been sharper, etc. but there was no time to worry about that stuff.  I cropped to a more panoramic aspect ratio (and cropped out another visitor to the park who was in the left side of my frame) then processed mainly with a bunch of curves and masks to selectively adjust contrast.  I tweaked the white balance a bit to move from a completely black and white cast toward having a wee bit of warmth.


View From Ke’e Beach, Kauai, Hawaii

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6785001939/in/photostream

Ke'e Beach, Kauai, Hawaii 40mm, f/9, 3-exp, ISO 250

We’re having a great time in Hawaii.  Scenes like the one above abound here on the island of Kauai.  This shot was taken at Ke’e Beach which is at the end of the road on the north shore of Kauai.  The land beyond is only accessible by trail, boat, or helicopter.  Jurassic Park was filmed somewhere in those mountains so many of you have had a glimpse of what it’s like.

As much as I like to take (and process) photos, I *try* to limit it when on family vacations.  We went all over the east and north shore the other day but I only dragged my tripod out of the car once.  When we walked along Ke’e Beach I didn’t have a tripod so I put the camera down on some mossy rocks and used the timer to fire off 3 exposures.  I didn’t quite eliminate the blown-out highlights in my exposures but I didn’t want to be a drag on the group and spend a bunch of time fooling with the camera.  I used Photomatix to tonemap the exposures then Photoshop to play with some curves adjustments.


Squished Portrait

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6738817263/in/photostream

Squished Portrait 20mm, f/6.7, 1/20s, ISO 200

Another quick one in this post…still really busy.  The Cloud Gate sculpture in Chicago (aka “The Bean”) is just like a fun house mirror with infinite possibilities as far as my children are concerned.  We took a lot of group/self portraits on our last visit to Millennium Park and I’m sure this won’t be the last one I post.  I put this one through all sorts of tweaks in Lightroom in an attempt to highlight the subjects (us) and to bring out the various fingerprints, dirt, streaks, and distortion on the sculpture.  I pulled the image into Photoshop and tweaked some colors here and there (to mute them a bit).  I used Topaz Adjust to do some wild-ish things on a duplicate layer and blended that into most of the image at about 30% opacity.  Finally I used selective (via masks) sharpening and noise reduction to touch it up.


Searching

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6329033492/in/photostream

Searching 90mm, f/8, 1/320s, ISO 200

I posted this picture a long time back in a post about candid shots but I decided to re-post since it’s one of my favorites.  We were visiting friends in Rockport, TX and my son spent much of his time picking up little things on the waterfront.  As the sun headed toward the horizon one afternoon I spotted him intently searching the beach again and grabbed this shot.

What have I come to like about this one?  For starters, parents just like pictures of their kids. Second, he has that cute little look of concentration on his face.  Third, from a photographic standpoint I like that there’s just enough of his face showing to include him personally in the picture as opposed to some faceless “subject” (umm, yeah…I planned that…sure).  Finally the light and surroundings are just nice IMO.  As always, there are a few things I’d change if I were planning/posing this but I won’t dwell on those 🙂

I processed this picture differently this time.  I first cloned out a few things (a piece of plastic on the shore, a pole in the water, and a tiny clump of grass).  I then used several curves layers to selectively adjust areas of the shot and to add some vignette.  These layers were in luminosity mode since I wanted to pretty much leave the colors (which were very warm due to the setting sun) intact.  In Lightroom I did a few more minor tweaks with clarity and very specific exposure adjustments.


Horses, Montana Ranch

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6058678703/in/photostream

Horses, Montana Ranch 70mm, f/8, 1/20s, ISO 100

I loved Montana.  There were scenes like this everywhere — wide open spaces, mountains, horses — beautiful.  I passed this place several times and decided I needed to take a picture of it.  I waited a little bit for the horses to move into an interesting position (ie not with ALL their backs turned) and took the shot.  Simple, but I like it.

Processing consisted of cropping and playing around with things in Lightroom.  The main effect is the semi-desaturated, “old picture” look.

Just down the road from this ranch, I captured this shot of an old, rusty tractor and gave it a similar “old picture” treatment.

[Update in response to questions]

What a surprise to featured in Freshly Pressed. Thanks, everyone for the kind comments! What I liked about this picture was its simplicity and its portrayal of the vast open spaces — glad you like it too.

The picture was taken near Nye, MT in the Stillwater Valley. For those familiar with the area it was approximately half way between the Nye post office and the Stillwater mine. While I’ve driven through other parts of Montana, the Stillwater Valley is the only area where I’ve spent significant time (three different trips). There is basically no tourism which makes it that much more attractive. I’d highly recommend a visit to the forests and wilderness in this area. I’d also recommend renting an ATV (http://www.benbowatvrentals.com/) and heading up into the mountains — AMAZING views to be had. Unfortunately severe rain was threatening (and eventually arrived) when we rented the ATVs so the camera gear stayed in our cabin — no pics. The camera used was a Canon 5D mkii with a Canon 24-70 f/2.8L (at 70mm). The image was cropped slightly for aesthetic reasons which slightly reduces the “vastness” effect but improved the overall image.  Over time I’ll try to visit everyone’s blogs, but it may take a while!


The Great Court

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/4943396371/

The Great Court 10mm, f4.5, 1/500s nominal

During my not-a-photo-trip to Paris and London this past spring I still managed some interesting (IMO) shots.  This image taken in the Great Court inside the British Museum has been one of my favorites from the standpoint of its composition and the contrast of the blues and greens against the drab-ish stone.  Again, that’s just my opinion of course.

I’ve had difficulty processing this image, however.  I really wanted to process as an HDR and the three original handheld exposures were extremely difficult to line up properly.  I’ve noted that when shooting wide angles a slight bit of movement and/or rotation between exposures makes a huge difference.  Because of this, Photomatix did a very poor job of alignment and this left a lot of ghosting in the image.  Of course, I had the ability to mix the tonemapped image with the original exposures but it was proving to be a lot of work to tweak pieces of each layer to line up with the section I wanted to mask it into.  It also took more work than usual to get the original exposures looking just right in order to match the main image.  I pushed the texture and HDR-ishness farther than I normally do…just because it seems to work here.

One mistake that I couldn’t overcome was the fact that the light coming through the glass roof was blown out in all the exposures.  I call that a “mistake” but I really wasn’t taking the time to think through all the shots because I was doing very well at keeping the trip about time with my wife, not about photography.  Heath O’Fee has a good post about mistakes like this by the way — they don’t always ruin the shot [Here’s the link: http://yycofee.wordpress.com/2010/08/30/mistakes/].

Well, there it is — one of *my* favorite images.


A Most Blessed Event

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/4840065382/

The First Dance

I got to second-shoot my nephew’s wedding in Seattle a few weeks ago.  Since I wasn’t responsible for the primary set of photos I spent my time experimenting and attempting to get some unique images.  When the main photographer was using a normal lens, I mostly used my 10-20mm or my 70-200mm.  If she was using a telephoto, I typically went normal or wide, etc.  My goal was to capture things from a different angle (literally and figuratively) and get a different perspective on this blessed event.

For the shot at the top of the post I used my 10-20mm from about a foot off the ground.  This was the bride and groom’s first dance and I shot the whole thing from that angle.

The shot below of the groom and his mother (my sister-in-law) was taken with a focal length of 200mm.  It was tough getting this shot framed when zoomed in this tight on a moving couple.  However, since the main photog was getting the normal shots I just went with it and hoped it worked.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/4839436381/

The Groom and His Mother

As it got darker, things got tough.  There was almost no light where the dancing was taking place.  I shot with my widest aperture (f3.5 on the 10-20mm I used for most of these shots), bumped the ISO up, and then dragged the shutter a lot to get at least some ambient light from the background [I could write a whole post on how I played with flash/ISO/shutter/etc].  Here’s a shot from the dance floor well after dark:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/4839442227/

Serenading the Bride

I had a great time, and while I certainly had to cull many images from the set, I ended up with many good images for the bride and groom to enjoy the rest of their lives.


Day Tripping in London

Since our trip to Paris it seems that I’ve never been able to catch up with “things”.  Photography has certainly been a temporary casualty but I’ve managed to process most of the photos from the trip.  Most pics got the quick exposure/contrast treatment but I managed a few HDRs as well.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/4704675765/

The Meeting Place - London St. Pancras

We spent our six nights in Paris but included a day trip to London during the week.  I booked us in “leisure select” (effectively what we’d call business class) on the earliest Eurostar between Gare du Nord (Paris) and London St. Pancras and then the latest train back to Paris.  Frankly the train rides were quite enjoyable and relaxing.  The image above was taken in the St. Pancras train station and shows a statue called The Meeting Place by Paul Day.  The architecture (interior and exterior) of the train station alone would have made for a decent day’s photowalk.  I read somewhere (probably wikipedia) that the station underwent a $1 billion+ renovation in the last decade.  There are still some construction fences around portions of the exterior — I only noticed because they ruined some photo opportunities.

The pic below was taken on the bridge at the entrance to the Tower of London.  A catapult sits in the long-ago drained moat surrounding the walls.  While this image doesn’t really capture the essence of the Tower itself, it certainly helps me re-live that single day we spent in London.  Sunny and warm, blue sky with awesome clouds — such a rarity in London.  It seemed that everyone we met made some comment to the effect of “You sure got some of our best weather for your visit”.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/4704693181/

Catapult at the Tower of London

The Tower was amazing.  The history of the place is SO interesting.  The Beefeaters tour was quite entertaining as well.  We spent about three hours inside and that was skimming a lot of the text on plaques and such.  We’d certainly go back and spend more time if we visit London again.

The HDR above was created using three handheld exposures.  Tonemapped in Photomatix with some typical contrast, sharpening, etc…no blending with original exposures.