Posts tagged “street

Moving Bus

Moving Bus 24mm, f/22, 1/6s

Practiced capturing some motion “stuff” during a recent-ish photowalk on the University of Texas campus. I think the red blur and subtle wheel-spinning pattern from the passing SUV adds to the photo.  To shoot this I set my aperture to f/22, pre-focused on the far lane and switched to manual focus, used some test shots to pick a shutter speed, and then panned with the next bus which came by.


One If By Land, Two If By Sea

All I could think of when I saw these two conversing on the street in Boston: “One if by land, two if by sea! C’mon, lady, how hard can this be to remember?!” Heavily cropped, but not much processing on this photo otherwise.


Take Me Out To The Ballgame

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/7162405578/in/photostream

Fenway Park in HDR, 17mm, f/13, 3-exp, ISO 100

Here’s another view of Fenway Park which I processed as an HDR.  I took a bunch of pictures around the place a few weeks ago and am only now getting around to looking at most of them.  The back of the scoreboard provides a nice main subject IMO.  Ideally I would have gotten the foreground people at full height (i.e. head-to-toe) in these shots but my lens wasn’t capable of that at this tripod height (and I didn’t like the perspective with the tripod all the way down near the ground). I took lots of exposures (range of 7-9 stops…can’t remember) but only used three of them for this image.  Why only three?  Because I don’t mind a few blown-out highlights where “appropriate” and I certainly don’t mind shadows without detail.  In fact, my number one criticism of HDRs is that many people process them in a way which brings out far too much detail in the shadows and eliminates too many of the blacks.

Processing…After running the three exposures through Nik HDR Efex Pro I brought the image into Photoshop with the three original exposures.  I only ended up using two exposures: One for partially blending in the sky to help keep the colors reasonable-ish and the other one was masked in for the street and people (after an exposure tweak).  As always I used several masked curves adjustment layers (in luminosity blend mode because this image had plenty of color saturation already).  The jet contrail bugs me but I’d make a mess of it if I tried to clone it out.  Since I was standing below the sign and using a wide-angle lens the perspective (tilt on the sides) was rather extreme.  A quick free transform was used to stretch out the top corners of the image somewhat.  I didn’t attempt to eliminate all the distortion of course.  After this type of stretching with a free transform, the height of things (the people in particular) gets a bit squashed so I used a reverse crop and another free transform to stretch the image vertically and bring the people back to normal.  Maybe I’ll do a poor-man’s tutorial (the only kind I have the skills for) showing those steps in an upcoming post.


iPhone 4S — An Amazing Little Camera

iPhone HDR with a few Lightroom edits

I frankly haven’t been very impressed with the  iPhone’s HDR feature until yesterday.  The image at the top was taken with my iPhone 4S with the HDR option turned on, then edited quickly with Lightroom to add some contrast and clarity mainly.  I often try the HDR feature and don’t see a ton of difference.  This time the HDR option just happened to be left on from the last time I’d tried it but as you can see, the results are impressive for a phone camera.

Here are the straight-out-of-the-iphone images:

Non-HDR

Straight-out-of-iPhone HDR


Occupy Guadalupe Street

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6849980037/in/photostream/

Occupy Guadalupe Street 60mm, f/4.5, 1/400s, ISO 200

This evening I attended a great photowalk on the University of Texas campus.  Kudos to Lotus Carroll and Juan Gonzalez for putting it together and leading the way.  I’ve not joined in many Austin photowalks (just don’t have that much time) but I’ve always enjoyed them when I do.  I hadn’t met any of the other photowalkers who attended but everyone was quite friendly (as usual with photog groups).  If you search for ‘utphotowalk’ on google+ I’m sure you’ll see many awesome shots from the other photogs.

I got a few decent shots and the one above has already become a favorite of mine.  I’m not sure what this girl was protesting but many other little girls were holding up signs like this too 🙂  I did ask her mother if it was OK to take the shot and she readily obliged.

On a side note, did you know they take credit cards?


Generator Room, Holly Street Power Plant

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5511411688/

Generator Room, Holly Street Power Plant

 

 

Thought I’d post another image from the photog excursion to the Holly Street Power Plant.  We had a great time and processing the images helps to re-live the experience somewhat.  I also want to get through some of these images and pass them on to the folks at Austin Energy in a timely manner.  Today we — a group of Austin photogs who somehow ended up being called the HDR Mafia — had a group lunch at Chuy’s.  Every month or two we get together and talk photo stuff.  It’s great to hear about what others are experimenting with, what they’re doing business-wise, etc.  Not everyone uses HDR extensively but we all dabble in it at least.

The image at the top is a 6-exposure HDR which was taken in the generator room.  Processing consisted of tonemapping in Photomatix, masking in pieces of various original exposures, masking parts of two layers processed with different settings in Topaz Adjust, then playing with a couple of curves layers and masking them in appropriately.  I didn’t notice the blue glow until I got the exposures home…not sure where that came from.  It adds a bit of mystery.

The image below is a 4-exposure HDR of a random beam with huge cables attached.  This was also in the generator room.  Countless items like this were available to shoot.  I processed this image in a more straightforward-ish manner.  I tonemapped in Photomatix, added curves adjustment layers to portions of the frame, and blended in a layer processed in Topaz Adjust (but I used a much more subtle preset than I did with the top image).  I’m really not stuck on one way to process or one final outcome with these HDR images.  It’s not like a wedding shoot where one needs to pay great attention to color matching sets of images and such.  I consider each of these HDRs to be its own thing and play each by ear as I process.  The outcome is greatly influenced by what I’m in the mood for at the moment.

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5511399690/

Beam and Cable, Holly Street Power Plant

 

 


Holly Street Power Plant In HDR

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5501068716/

Holly Street Power Plant In HDR 10mm, f/13

Mike Connell set up an appointment for several of us local Austinites to tour and photograph inside the Holly Street Power Plant (see Mike’s story here).  It would have been a joy to see the place even if we couldn’t photograph it.  When energy was still being generated here I used to run the trails adjacent to it and I’ve always wanted to see inside the place.  Needless to say, I jumped at the chance to join my friends for this adventure.  The plant has been closed for a few years and is scheduled for demolition starting in a few months so this is a last-chance opportunity.

There is no electrical power in the plant currently and as we entered through an unlit room our guide — a burly guy named Bobby Gosey — remarked that we wouldn’t believe how creepy the place is at night.  Most of the floors were metal grates which creaked and clanked as we walked and the darkness below was apparently endless in the dimly-lit environment.  None of us had to push our imagination too far to believe him.

As I’ve perused the resulting images I’ve thrown out far more than I’ve decided to keep but I do like how a few turned out.  The photo above shows the entrance to one of the control room areas.  I thought it was an appropriate image to start with given the prominent Austin Energy logo on the door.  I’ll post “something rusty” in the future.

While poking around online, I found a site which has all the “as-built” architectural drawings for the power plant.  I find these drawings kind of cool…I’m just a geek that way.  Here’s the link for you other geeks: http://www.holly.austinenergy.com/asbuilts.htm.

Thanks go out to Carlos Cordova and Bobby Gosey for accommodating our group and giving us freedom to roam at will throughout the facility.


Zipping By

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/4994610725/

Zipping By (10mm, f/8, 1/15s, ISO 200)

For the last 4+ years, my main drive (or “sled” as a former neighbor used to say) has been a 2000 BMW 540i.  Awesome V8, 6-speed manual transmission, sport package, and sport suspension .  One note of trivia is that it’s one of the few cars where you actually had to pay *extra* for the stick.  At 10 years old with over 150,000 miles it still runs perfectly and handles like a dream.  The car is tight.  However, the maintenance is getting to be a real headache.  I generally like to do my own maintenance when I can (water pumps, radiators, alternators and such) and BMWs — at least the three that I’ve had over the years — are quite easy to work on.  There are so many resources available in print and on the internet which can tell you what every last bolt on the car is for.  These days it’s really hard to find the time so “maintenance” has degraded into “take it to the shop”.  I haven’t even done my own oil changes lately.  My 6 year old loves to change the oil and I’m robbing him of a great chance to learn to work on cars…

A couple of months ago I bought a truck to replace the one I gave my oldest daughter when she got married.  That truck has become my daily drive for various reasons (maybe someday I’ll write a post about trucks, 4-wheeling at the beach, and just being manly).  Occasionally I’ll drive the 540 and I still enjoy it, but it’s time to sell it (anyone in the market?).

As I prepped to sell the car, I thought back to this image taken on the streets of Paris last spring.  I was poking around with the camera and spotted a Mini Cooper speeding toward me.  I was fairly fresh off a workshop taught by Raul Touzon and one of the things he had taught us was his method for capturing motion like this (see this post). I attempted a panning shot of the Mini and this 5 series followed soon after…grabbed it too.  The shot of the car headed away symbolizes my 5 series leaving the family (sniff).  Just kidding, how sappy would that be? — it’s actually just a cool shot IMO!  No symbolism in this one 🙂  It would have been great if the entire car was sharp but I can live with the look here — it gives an additional sense of speed like the car is just headed into some sort of a time warp.

I started with a single exposure and I tonemapped it in Photomax.  Then I blended it at about 50% opacity with the original exposure.  I used overlay mode for the blending.  Topaz Adjust, curves, sharpening, and Noiseware were used selectively in the image.  I left in lots of the noise to give the motion-blurred portions a bit of grain and texture.  Finally I brought it into Lightroom and touched up a few things before exporting.

I hope you think this is a cool scene too.


To HDR or Not to HDR…

[Yes, I know the more proper title may be “To Tonemap or Not to Tonemap” but it just doesn’t sound as good]

HDR is fun — a downright blast I’d say.  It’s very easy to get caught up in it to the point where you (1) always bracket your shots and (2) always tonemap in Photomatix or similar software.  Why?  The images are often stunning.

Lately I’m finding more and more high-dynamic-range situations where tonemapping isn’t my preferred option.  Take, for example, these exposures of 6th Street in Austin taken on a photowalk organized by Alex Suarez during SXSW.  I wanted to tone down the intensity of some of the lights yet show detail in other areas.

Three 6th Street Exposures

After tonemapping, I got this:

Tonemapped image

I played with combinations of settings and some were better than others.  In the end though, no tonemapping settings produced an image which I was personally happy with.  I decided to start with my center exposure as the base layer and see what I could do with it.  I rather like the final result and I’ll explain below how I processed it.  I’m sure there are better ways to do this but frankly I’m a CS4 novice and this fits in my current skill set.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/4439130642

6th Street At Night (click to view on flickr)

Here’s the short description of what I did:  I started with the layer which contained the normal (“0”) exposure on top.  I placed the -2 exposure underneath, created a layer mask and blended the darker layer into some of the blown-out areas (neon signs for example).  I darkened a few other spots according to my taste as well.  Using the same masking process I blended in parts of the +2 exposure to bring out some detail in the shadows — went very easy on this because I still wanted this to look like a night shot under the streetlights.  I also played with all the layers to get the look I wanted with the moving traffic.

Next, I had to do something with the people on the sidewalk.  Ideally I would have taken them from the normal exposure but there was too much motion blur.  The only acceptable exposure from this standpoint was the -2, but the subjects were far too dark.  I simply duplicated the -2 layer and gave it some treatment — bumped up the exposure, played with the contrast, etc. — in order to make the sidewalk and people roughly match the normal exposure.  This allowed me to blend them in reasonably and obtain the (roughly) still look I wanted.  I also used that layer to touch up a few other areas.  One of the guys in the foreground still ended up without an arm…but I worked with what I had and he was moving in all the exposures 🙂

Of course I finished off with curves, sharpening, etc.

So, that’s it…I hope you like the shot and I also hope I’ve inspired some simple non-HDR experimentation.  I’d love to hear your comments, particularly related to what approach you might have taken to process a shot like this.