Posts tagged “photoshop

Kauai Silhouette

Image

I was experimenting with silhouettes early one morning in Kauai, HI.  The camera was triggered with a wireless shutter release (was thankful I didn’t have to scramble back and forth through the sand and rocks using the self-timer).  I’m sure that someone thinks that there’s only one right way to shoot silhouettes but my preference is to error on the side of slightly overexposing relative to a completely black silhouette.  This varies based on the background but I want to make sure to get enough detail in the non-silhouetted portions of the photo.  Of course I could composite multiple exposures but I find it simpler to use Lightroom and/or Photoshop to reduce the exposure in the appropriate areas to get a complete silhouette if that’s what I’m after.  Often there’s no need for this extra work though — I usually can get I what I want in-camera (I did with this one).  Shooting brackets isn’t a bad idea either if you’re unsure.  The textures were added via OnOne Perfect Photo Suite.


Lady Cougars 2012

For the second year in a row I’ve taken pictures for my daughters’ volleyball team.  The individual shots were pretty much a piece of cake and they turned out great.  The set up for those involved spreading a neutral-colored paint tarp on the floor to eliminate the red glow on the girls’ skin, standing the girls on a stool, setting up one speedlight (triggered with Elinchrom Skyports) shooting through a white umbrella for the key light, a strobe flashing the gym behind the girls to add light to the background, posing them with a volleyball, and firing away.  These went very quickly as there was no change in setup between each girl.  The gym is horrible for pictures but was workable for these individual shots.

We also goofed with some dramatic shots with the girls looking serious and got the shot above.  The main light is the same speedlight-thru-umbrella held nearly on axis with the camera (slightly toward high camera left).  The back light is simply a speedlight plopped on the floor.  These took longer to get the girls set and posed, and as you see above, we never got the posing or the spacing quite right.  We didn’t have all day so I had to take what I could get as they say.  There are lots of photographic flaws but the girls and parents are plenty happy with the pic, which is what really counts.

I did some basic processing in Lightroom then headed to Photoshop to grunge out and darken the background (mostly with curves), do some very minor edits and retouching, noise reduction, and add the text.


Storm Panorama

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/7579390824/in/photostream

Storm Panorama 70mm, f/5.6, 1/180s, ISO 200, 10 frames

It’s pouring rain again tonight.  Lots of lightning and thunder too…awesome.  Last night after the rain I noticed some clouds to the east so I shot about 20 handheld frames along the horizon.  The above image was cropped from the resulting stitched panorama (probably about 10 frames worth).  I did some basic contrast adjustments in Photoshop after the stitch then went back into Lightroom.  I’d recently seen a very cool cloud/lightning image done in black and white and decided to go that route with this one.  I used the channel mixer in Lightroom to adjust the image to taste.  In very rough terms that meant darkening the blues and brightening the reds.


Take Me Out To The Ballgame

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/7162405578/in/photostream

Fenway Park in HDR, 17mm, f/13, 3-exp, ISO 100

Here’s another view of Fenway Park which I processed as an HDR.  I took a bunch of pictures around the place a few weeks ago and am only now getting around to looking at most of them.  The back of the scoreboard provides a nice main subject IMO.  Ideally I would have gotten the foreground people at full height (i.e. head-to-toe) in these shots but my lens wasn’t capable of that at this tripod height (and I didn’t like the perspective with the tripod all the way down near the ground). I took lots of exposures (range of 7-9 stops…can’t remember) but only used three of them for this image.  Why only three?  Because I don’t mind a few blown-out highlights where “appropriate” and I certainly don’t mind shadows without detail.  In fact, my number one criticism of HDRs is that many people process them in a way which brings out far too much detail in the shadows and eliminates too many of the blacks.

Processing…After running the three exposures through Nik HDR Efex Pro I brought the image into Photoshop with the three original exposures.  I only ended up using two exposures: One for partially blending in the sky to help keep the colors reasonable-ish and the other one was masked in for the street and people (after an exposure tweak).  As always I used several masked curves adjustment layers (in luminosity blend mode because this image had plenty of color saturation already).  The jet contrail bugs me but I’d make a mess of it if I tried to clone it out.  Since I was standing below the sign and using a wide-angle lens the perspective (tilt on the sides) was rather extreme.  A quick free transform was used to stretch out the top corners of the image somewhat.  I didn’t attempt to eliminate all the distortion of course.  After this type of stretching with a free transform, the height of things (the people in particular) gets a bit squashed so I used a reverse crop and another free transform to stretch the image vertically and bring the people back to normal.  Maybe I’ll do a poor-man’s tutorial (the only kind I have the skills for) showing those steps in an upcoming post.


Boston Skyline…Blue Hour

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/7116298547/in/photostream

Boston Skyline At Blue Hour 23mm, f/8, 6 exp, ISO 100

Last weekend, after spending the day touring Boston, I walked across the pedestrian bridge (near the left side of the above image) next to Seaport Blvd which connects downtown to the old seaport district.  The bridge is part of the South Bay Harbor Trail.  I stopped for dinner and waited for the sun to set behind the city.  As I neared this photo spot I found that four photographers were already sitting there — tripods and cameras already set up.  I walked toward them and without a word stopped 10′ in front of them and pretended to set up my tripod.  Silence.  After a few seconds I turned and said I was just kidding and relieved laughter set in.  I asked if it was OK to set up just behind them and they were nice enough to extend an offer to make room in the middle of them if I wanted (I just set up behind and above them).

My intent was to bracket a bunch of exposures as it got darker using f/22 to get a starburst effect.  I switched to f/8 because (1) I really wasn’t getting much of that effect, (2) f/8 is good and sharp, and (3) my exposures were getting longer than 30 seconds and I was too lazy to start timing the exposures manually even though I was using a remote 🙂  White balance was set to daylight.  That’s somewhat arbitrary since I always shoot in RAW but it helps keep things consistent when viewed in the LCD.  I included a couple of straight-out-of-the-camera exposures below so you can see a sample of what I was working with.

On my flight home I plugged six exposures into Nik HDR Efex Pro.  My personal default is to use the realistic-subtle preset as a starting point 99% of the time and I tweak a bit in Nik.  Tweaking and saving complete, I took the Nik output into Photoshop along with a couple of the darker exposures and masked in a few spots which were still over-exposed after the HDR junk.  I toned down the colors in the water and burned the sidewalk darker a bit (more on the dodging and burning below).  Relative to colors, I did want an “HDR look” to this image but I sometimes find the reflections and colors on the water to be a bit overdone for my taste in these skyline shots.  I also dropped the overall saturation by 20 points to bring it back to realistic colors as tools like Nik HDR Efex Pro and Photomatix tend to saturate everything a lot.

Finally, since the perspective wasn’t too bad I decided to fix it by stretching out the top corners a bit and aligning the buildings with rulers to make them more upright on the edges (the SOOC images above do not have that correction).  If you do too big of an edit like this it can degrade the image but it’s fine for this one.  The final image turned out crisp and sharp at high resolution.

This screenshot shows my dodging and burning layer.  A trick I learned watching a Joe Brady video (something about Photoshop for landscapes sponsored by Xrite) is to create a new layer, fill it with 50% gray, then dodge and burn on that with black/white.  There’s no real need for that but the layer gives you a visual to show where you’re doing your adjustments.


Multiples

The shot above didn’t turn out quite as cool as I’d hoped but it’s fun nonetheless.  While out on a photo walk on the University of Texas campus I set up my camera on my tripod as the photographer crowd gathered on the steps of the UT Tower.  As people milled around I captured shots in a semi-regular cadence.  My idea was to capture people in different positions and mask them together in Photoshop.  When I uploaded my photos to my computer it turned out that I really didn’t capture enough frames.  For example, look at the guy in the red jacket.  He probably wandered all around the scene but in reality I only capture him in a few spots.  There are a couple of people who did appear in widely varied positions around the scene.

The photo above was captured at the base of the UT Tower, a prominent 307-foot building on the University of Texas campus.  A couple other views of the UT Tower are shown below.


Filters And Layers

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6967631567/in/photostream/

Twirl

Another post written on a plane between Austin and Seattle the other night…I like this WordPress post scheduling thing…

A few months ago I tried out a new “technique” (for lack of a better word) to create the image above.  I used — with some tweaks along the way — this tutorial at Digital Darkroom Techniques.  You may or may not find the actual image interesting (I only like *some* things about it) but the method to create it may be of interest to you — and you can tweak/customize it to your heart’s content.  It came to mind to post about this when I saw a similar image last week.  The creator of that image didn’t mention where they got their inspiration but I immediately thought of my image above.

My starting image was the one below, which happened to be sitting around on my desktop when I decided to try out the steps laid out in the tutorial.  You can read about how I made the starting image HERE.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6821511114/in/photostream

Blue Hour Baseball

I won’t go into any details on the steps involved since the tutorial does a fine job of explaining it.  Try it out, try changing things up with respect to which filters/angles/layers you use, and if you don’t mind, put a link to your results in the comments.


Two of My Boys: Bokeh Panorama

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6772922676/in/photostream/lightbox/

Two of My Boys: Bokeh Panorama 50mm, f/1.4, 1/640s, ISO 100,14 frames...sort of

[Update: Here’s another try at it]

This evening I photographed my youngest boys in the backyard with the goal of trying out something called the Brenizer Method, or bokeh panorama.  I first heard of it in a post by Brandon Brasseaux. The goal of the Brenizer Method is to create an image with extremely shallow depth of field.  If I were to take the shot above using a single frame I would either (1) use a very wide-angle lens or (2) use a “normal” lens and stand far back from the scene.  In either case it would be difficult to get much bokeh in the image.  I’ll let you consult a depth-of-field calculator for the exact details but suffice it to say that the wide-angle lens — even at an aperture of f/1.8 — doesn’t result in much bokeh when focused at any reasonable distance.  A lens like I was using in this shot — a 50mm f/1.4 — would require such a long focus distance (i.e. I’d have to stand so far back) that the depth of field would large enough to eliminate a lot of bokeh.  The Brenizer Method uses multiple frames to form the image — using a much shorter focus distance resulting in much shallower depth of field than if you shot one frame standing further from the subject.

The process goes as follows: Instead of standing far away, stand close (I roughly filled the frame with the two boys).  I used an aperture of f/1.4 to get the shallowest depth of field and set a shutter speed in manual mode to keep the exposure consistent in all the frames (I also set the camera to daylight white balance).  I prefocused on the boys and switched the lens to manual focus.  The first frame I took was the one with the boys in it (took many tries to get something decent).  I then let them run off and proceeded to shoot overlapping frames (with the camera in the same location) of the rest of the scene you see above.  I used 14 straight-out-of-the-camera frames to stitch the panorama in Photoshop but in the end I cropped the image quite a bit. It took all of two minutes to shoot the frames, even with the boys’ goofing off.  Since my goal was to try out the method itself, I didn’t stress about background, lens flare, etc.

After stitching I warmed the image a bit, added vignette, tweaked the exposure/clarity on the boys, and removed some of the color fringing on the branches so it wasn’t *so* prominent.  Pretty simple stuff.  I want to try more of these but next time I’ll find a prettier background.  I believe I’ve given enough info for one to start playing with it but if not, an internet search will turn up a lot more information in a hurry.

Here’s a link to posts by the man behind it all: http://www.ryanbrenizer.com/category/brenizer-method/


Shattered Reflections…and Curves Adjustment Layers

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6907108389/in/photostream

Shattered Reflection 50mm, f/5.6, 1/25s, ISO 400

My daughter and I were on a walk in downtown Austin today and ran across this shattered glass in a door.  I snapped a shot of my reflected portrait.  I had a mind to see what I could bring out of it using Photoshop’s curves layers.  I knew from past experience that curves could do some cool stuff to images like this.

The images at the bottom of the post were taken inside the decommissioned Seaholm Power Plant in Austin (posts about that here and here and here).  The blown-out spots in the original image are from bright daylight coming in through windows on the opposite side of the building.  Inspired by David Nightingale’s tutorials on creating dramatic images, I experimented with all sorts of wacky curves and masks.  With some of those wacky curves adjustments the blown-out spots really created problems so in the end I just cropped them out.  The final image is rather abstract — the hand is obvious but the camera, tripod, and my body are there but not completely obvious.  There are a few issues (knuckles on the hand for example) but it’s fun nonetheless.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6900307241/in/photostream

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6900304467/in/photostream/

Seaholm Power Plant Door, after curves adjustments

Back to the images at the top of the post.  You may already know that curves adjustments can cause a color shift depending on the blend mode of the layer.  I took advantage of this to bring out a bunch of color in this image.  It would have been nice if I’d been wearing something other than a black jacket but I didn’t exactly plan this in advance.  The adjustments on this image were just a strong s-curve and a combination of curves which lightened/darkened the midtones — all in normal blend mode and masked a bit here and there.  Some selective sharpening, noise reduction, and a small bit of overall saturation were added.


Fire Dancer…Capturing Motion

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6833628735/in/photostream/

Fire Dancer 50mm, f/7.1, 1/15s, ISO 1600

My wife and I (and several in her family) attended a luau while in Hawaii last week.  I have no idea what an old traditional luau was like or how authentic the festivities were but in any case it was immensely enjoyable.  Knowing that the main show would be after dark, I fitted my camera with my 50mm f/1.4 lens.  Night photography has never been something I’ve been good at (maybe that can be said about all my photography 🙂 ).  I’m always going back and forth with myself on the best combination for getting good exposures — shutter/aperture/ISO.  Noise is always a consideration (not so much now that one of my bodies is a 5D Mkii).

For much of this show I wanted to mostly freeze the motion (like in the second shot above) so I shot in manual mode with an aperture between 1.4 and 2.8, shutter speed in the 1/500s – 1/640s range, and ISO 1600-3200 (the stage lighting varied from act to act and I tweaked settings accordingly).  Depth of field wasn’t much of an issue because my focus point was quite far.  However, I also spent time trying to capture some of the motion in the dances.  I was shooting handheld so I did have to consider that when deciding how long to open the shutter.  I played around with various shutter speeds and came out with some fun shots.  For the fire shots I had hoped to be able to reduce the exposure enough to avoid blowing out the highlights of the flames completely but in doing so I ended up underexposing everything else much more than I liked.  In the shot above I like the balance between capturing motion in the flame yet keeping some clarity in the dancer.  Some shots blurred things more (see image below) and that’s interesting in its own right but I prefer the balance in the shot at the top of the post.

Processing was quite simple for all these shots.  I shot with daylight white balance so that I effectively captured the colors consistently.  The color turned out rather well.  I used a bit of clarity and sometimes bumped the exposure up a hair in Lightroom.  Finally, I exported from Lightroom with a preset that ran the images through a noise reduction action (using Noiseware) in Photoshop.