Posts tagged “mountains

Sotol Vista Overlook, Big Bend National Park

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5813729402/in/photostream

Sotol Vista Overlook, Big Bend National Park 24mm, f/22, (bracketed shutter speed), ISO 100

Photographers wish they could take all their pictures during the golden light of sunrise and sunset but for those of us far south of the polar circle (in the northern hemisphere of course) those are very brief moments in time.  During my recent trip I wanted to make the most of my available time so I photographed what interested me regardless of the quality of light.  Even the “poor” pictures make for good memories.  Adding to the problem of harsh sunlight was a very thick haze.  I don’t know if was related to the heat or possibly due to smoke from wildfires, but it was a problem for pictures.

One afternoon we stopped at the Sotol Vista Overlook to take some pictures.  This desert overlook is roughly halfway between the Chisos Mountains and the Rio Grande along Ross Maxwell Scenic Drive.  The small gap in the horizon is Santa Elena Canyon — 14 miles as the crow flies according to a sign posted here.  Looks tiny but the canyon walls rise up to 1500′ above the river per the park service’s website.  I bracketed a bunch of scenes and hoped for the best.  I came up with this 6-exposure HDR (the first HDR I’ve done in quite a while) and I rather like it, especially considering the harsh light and haze.  I made attempts at processing single frames but the dynamic range was way too large (I don’t own an ND graduated filter — yet — else I would have made use of it here).

Processing consisted of tonemapping in Photomatix, an s-curve, sharpening, noise reduction, and a slight color tweak with the channel mixer in Photoshop.  I didn’t do any blending with the original exposures.


Sometimes Simpler Is Better

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5344880323/

Sunrise in Fort Davis (edited) 18mm, f/9, 1/20s

Sometimes simple tweaks result in amazing improvements to an image.  The photo above was the result of putting an original exposure through a simple ‘S’ curves adjustment, adding a very small cyan, blue, and yellow saturation boost, sharpening theedges of the wispy clouds, and a spin through noise reduction in Noiseware.  That’s it.  The curves adjustment by itself brought out a ton of color, especially the touch of red on the bottom of the darkest clouds.  This edit was all of 5 minutes and 4 minutes of that was just experimentation.

I was going to try tonemapping a single exposure as well as tonemapping three bracketed exposures but there was no need (atleast not for what I was after).  The clouds were moving so fast that a 3-exposure HDR would have required the whole sky to be masked from one exposure anyway.  I would have been left with a tonemapped mountainside.  Instead, I opted for the mountain to be a silhouette in order to put the focus on the sky.

Compositionally the image is not all that great.  However, I was at my widest setting (18mm at the time) and didn’t want to chop off any more blue sky.  I have other exposures in which I placed the sunrise in a more ideal spot but I’m not sure I like the overall image any better.  Maybe I’ll post one at a later time.

This photo was taken last year in Davis Mountains State Park in Fort Davis, TX.  During our week there we saw some of the most amazing cloud formations in the bluest of skies.  The night skies are void of light pollution, providing beautiful views of the stars above.  This of course is why the McDonald Observatory (part of the University of Texas) is located near Fort Davis.  The weather is also very nice due to the high elevation (the town is about 5000′ and much of the park is higher).  We were there in August and it got a touch warm in the hottest part of the day but it was very pleasant otherwise.

The original exposure is shown below for comparison.

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5344880321/

Sunrise in Fort Davis (original)


The Mighty B-1

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/4819569609/

The Mighty B-1

I remember the first and only time I saw a B-1 bomber (actually it was two of them) in flight.  My son and I were driving south on US 385 headed from Marathon to Big Bend National Park in the fall of 2004.  Cruising happily along, two B-1s buzzed diagonally across our path, a few hundred feet off the ground.  It was every bit as cool as any flyover I’d seen before.

I thought about that pass here and there over the years and didn’t quite know what to make of it.  Why were they flying so low?  Why were they flying in that vicinity?  I learned the answers at an airshow I recently attended in Kingsville, TX.  A pilot informed me that the jets were most likely out of Dyess AFB near Abilene, TX and were doing exercises using the below-the-radar flying capabilities of the planes.  The semi-mountainous terrain in that area is perfect for that type of flying — stretches of flat land with mountains jutting from the landscape here and there.

The B-1 fleet is (potentially) slated for retirement due to budget constraints and the changing nature of air warfare.  I really don’t have enough knowledge to have any comments on that but I’m glad I got to see a couple of them fly while they were still in service.  Some of the history and technical info on wikipedia and other sites is a fascinating read if you like that sort of thing.

The image above is a single exposure, no tonemapping…just some curves/levels/sharpness adjustments.  I think it gives a good feel for the size and sleekness of this awesome plane.  You can view an HDR of the underside of a B-1 bomber on flickr here.