Posts tagged “Hawaii

Kauai Silhouette

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I was experimenting with silhouettes early one morning in Kauai, HI.  The camera was triggered with a wireless shutter release (was thankful I didn’t have to scramble back and forth through the sand and rocks using the self-timer).  I’m sure that someone thinks that there’s only one right way to shoot silhouettes but my preference is to error on the side of slightly overexposing relative to a completely black silhouette.  This varies based on the background but I want to make sure to get enough detail in the non-silhouetted portions of the photo.  Of course I could composite multiple exposures but I find it simpler to use Lightroom and/or Photoshop to reduce the exposure in the appropriate areas to get a complete silhouette if that’s what I’m after.  Often there’s no need for this extra work though — I usually can get I what I want in-camera (I did with this one).  Shooting brackets isn’t a bad idea either if you’re unsure.  The textures were added via OnOne Perfect Photo Suite.


Kayak Trip To Secret Falls, Kauai

I apologize for some not-so-great pictures included in this post — they were taken with an old, low-ish resolution, waterproof point and shoot camera that I borrowed for our trip.  I made sure that the lens was dry before using it but it didn’t handle glare from the sun very well.  Had I been aware of that I would have shaded the lens whenever I shot into the sun.

Should you ever happen to visit the Hawaiian island of Kauai I highly recommend taking a kayak trip up the Wailua River to Secret Falls (some call it Sacred Falls).  Actually, you have to kayak AND hike but it’s well worth it.  The kayak part is roughly 2 miles each way if memory serves me correctly and the hike is a pretty easy 3/4 of a mile.  Overall the trip takes 4-5 hours.  We used Ali’i Kayaks and our guide was TC.  He was great.  There was the usual tour guide humor but also a lot of interesting information.  He answered all sorts of random questions from us as we hiked.

The outfitter provided dry bags for each couple (just happened to be all couples in our group) in which we could pack a lunch to be eaten at the falls and whatever else we wanted.  I packed my Canon 5D Mkii in a dry bag that I brought, then put that inside the other dry bag.  I didn’t know what to expect at the falls but decided to pack the DSLR.  I did not pack the tripod.  After some quick paddling instruction from the guide — several of our group had never been on a kayak before — we paddled upstream.  Along the way we viewed several movie filming locations but the only two I remember are one where Indiana Jones was running from the natives through the jungle and a village which was used to film the African village scene in the movie Outbreak.  We beached the kayaks, hiked to the falls, and hung out for nearly an hour to eat lunch, wade (people like me) or swim if you were crazy (my wife and sister-in-law) as the water was freezing.  I got someone to take our picture…from the instruction I had to give I wonder if he’d ever used a camera 🙂  The shot below doesn’t give a sense of how tall the falls are given the wide-angle lens used.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6873738470/in/photostream

Secret Falls, Kauai 24mm, f/5, 1/320s, ISO 400

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6873740210/in/photostream


Hawaiian Sunburst

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6852714966/in/photostream

Hawaiian Sunburst 17mm, f/22, 9 exposures, ISO 100

While in Hawaii I managed to catch the sunrise most mornings (not necessarily for pictures).  As the sun rose over this jetty in Kauai I stopped all the way down to f/22 in hopes of getting a nice sunburst — success.  The lens flare effect (real — not added in post) is nice too.  I had hoped to get more interest and/or color out of that rope in the rocks but it doesn’t add much unfortunately.

The image was processed in Nik HDR Efex Pro using 9 exposures.  Lightroom was used for most of the touch-up and then Photoshop was used for curves and noise adjustments.


St. Regis Hotel, Kauai

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6888363289/in/photostream/

St. Regis Hotel, Kauai, Hawaii 17mm, f/16, ISO 200, 8 exposures

I’m posting another HDR that I processed in my Photomatix vs Nik HDR Efex Pro evaluation war.  The subject here is the lobby of the St. Regis Hotel on the Hawaiian island of Kauai.  There was a multi-level water feature (a bit of which you see in this image) which provided all sorts of reflections and begged to be turned into some HDRs.  I didn’t have a tripod with me so I simply plopped the camera down on a ledge and fired of 9 bracket exposures in several locations.  This limited my composition choices but I was able to get the main thing I was after — the reflections in the water.  The hotel is situated in a beautiful spot on the island and commands a gorgeous view the mountains across a small bay.  If I’d had a tripod I would have taken shots from other positions to include a nice view of the ocean and mountains through the windows.

In this case Photomatix was dramatically better for quickly coming up with a result I liked.  The photo above is almost straight out of Photomatix — I only added some clarity/sharpening/noise reduction after that.  Nik gave some interesting results but did a lousy job keeping the clouds outside from being blown out.  Whenever I used the more realistic presets (realistic HDRs are generally my preference) the view out the windows was completely blown out.  No doubt I could have figured out how to get an acceptable result but it was taking a lot of time to begin to match what I got out of the Photomatix effort.

You’ll note the large shift in color cast across the image.  This was due to the prominence of daylight through the windows on the left side versus the interior tungsten lighting on the right.  It bothered me at first but it’s more realistic this way so I decided to leave the color as-is.


Hanalei Valley Lookout

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6884397965/in/photostream

Hanalei Valley Panorama, Kauai, Hawaii 35mm frames, f/16, ISO 200

Today I’m posting an HDR panorama of the Hanalei Valley in Kauai, Hawaii.  The main crop in the valley is taro. I mentioned in another post that I rarely lugged the tripod around while out with the family but I did usually have it in the car.  When we stopped at this lookout I went ahead and used to capture images for a pano of this valley.  As you can clearly see the dynamic range was quite large, especially with the bright clouds. I quickly picked an exposure (using manual mode) and fired off 3 exposures per position.  I didn’t want to hold the family up so I didn’t take the time to capture the whole dynamic range.  As such, the clouds still are blown out in spots but it’s still a picture worth having from the trip.

I tonemapped each set of brackets using the same settings then used Photoshop to stitch them together.  After that I simply tweaked the contrast.  One obvious improvement would be to clone or crop out the branch sticking into the top left part of the frame but I haven’t yet taken the time…


Trying Out Nik HDR Efex Pro

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Kauai Coastline (Nik HDR Efex Pro) 17mm, f/22, 7 exposures, ISO 400

I recently downloaded a trial version of Nik Software’s HDR Efex Pro.  I’d been semi-disappointed in many HDRs I’d created in Photomatix and had heard many people say they’d made the switch to Nik.  If you’re hoping for a complete review of Nik HDR Efex Pro I apologize in advance — I’m only going to give some impressions here.

First, a bit on Photomatix.  It’s great software in many ways and I’ve used it to make many cool (IMO) images.  However, in many of my HDRs of late I’ve ended up doing so much masking in Photoshop after tone mapping in Photomatix that I’m practically producing a composite of the original exposures.  Photomatix often doesn’t handle motion to my liking — leaving way too much work to do afterwards.  I’ll readily admit that it could be the user — I’m no wizard with Photomatix.  It could also be that I’m getting pickier as time goes on.  On the plus side, I find Photomatix to be much faster than Nik but I don’t process all that many HDRs so that’s not a huge factor.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6866428629/in/photostream

Pictures in Glass 24mm, f/2.8, 3 exposures, ISO 100

I used Nik HDR Efex Pro to process all but one of the images in this post.  For my own comparison purposes I processed another Hawaii coast photo — similar to the one at the top of this post — with Photomatix.  It’s not completely apples-to-apples since I didn’t process the *same* photo but I ended up having to spend a ton of time in Photoshop fixing up the Photomatix image (basically ending up with a composite as I mentioned above).

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6866594001/in/photostream/

Horse 30mm, f/11, 6 exposures, ISO 100

As for the mechanics of using Nik HDR Efex Pro, it’s quite simple.  In each of the images (5-ish?) that I’ve processed with it I’ve started out with a preset and tweaked from there.  Of course I’m still learning all the sliders, etc. but I’m happy with it so far.  I find the “control point” concept useful (it defines circles in which you can separately tweak portions of the image) but I would prefer that it worked more like the adjustment brush in Lightroom where you can choose exactly where the effects are applied.  The final images here aren’t completely to my liking (some spots would get fixed if I were to spend more time on the images) but are illustrative enough for this post.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6866431907/in/photostream/

28mm, f/14, 7 exposures, ISO 400

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6866568557/in/photostream/

Kauai Coastline (Photomatix "composite") 17mm, f/22, 7 exposures, ISO 200


Fire Dancer…Capturing Motion

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6833628735/in/photostream/

Fire Dancer 50mm, f/7.1, 1/15s, ISO 1600

My wife and I (and several in her family) attended a luau while in Hawaii last week.  I have no idea what an old traditional luau was like or how authentic the festivities were but in any case it was immensely enjoyable.  Knowing that the main show would be after dark, I fitted my camera with my 50mm f/1.4 lens.  Night photography has never been something I’ve been good at (maybe that can be said about all my photography 🙂 ).  I’m always going back and forth with myself on the best combination for getting good exposures — shutter/aperture/ISO.  Noise is always a consideration (not so much now that one of my bodies is a 5D Mkii).

For much of this show I wanted to mostly freeze the motion (like in the second shot above) so I shot in manual mode with an aperture between 1.4 and 2.8, shutter speed in the 1/500s – 1/640s range, and ISO 1600-3200 (the stage lighting varied from act to act and I tweaked settings accordingly).  Depth of field wasn’t much of an issue because my focus point was quite far.  However, I also spent time trying to capture some of the motion in the dances.  I was shooting handheld so I did have to consider that when deciding how long to open the shutter.  I played around with various shutter speeds and came out with some fun shots.  For the fire shots I had hoped to be able to reduce the exposure enough to avoid blowing out the highlights of the flames completely but in doing so I ended up underexposing everything else much more than I liked.  In the shot above I like the balance between capturing motion in the flame yet keeping some clarity in the dancer.  Some shots blurred things more (see image below) and that’s interesting in its own right but I prefer the balance in the shot at the top of the post.

Processing was quite simple for all these shots.  I shot with daylight white balance so that I effectively captured the colors consistently.  The color turned out rather well.  I used a bit of clarity and sometimes bumped the exposure up a hair in Lightroom.  Finally, I exported from Lightroom with a preset that ran the images through a noise reduction action (using Noiseware) in Photoshop.


View From Ke’e Beach, Kauai, Hawaii

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Ke'e Beach, Kauai, Hawaii 40mm, f/9, 3-exp, ISO 250

We’re having a great time in Hawaii.  Scenes like the one above abound here on the island of Kauai.  This shot was taken at Ke’e Beach which is at the end of the road on the north shore of Kauai.  The land beyond is only accessible by trail, boat, or helicopter.  Jurassic Park was filmed somewhere in those mountains so many of you have had a glimpse of what it’s like.

As much as I like to take (and process) photos, I *try* to limit it when on family vacations.  We went all over the east and north shore the other day but I only dragged my tripod out of the car once.  When we walked along Ke’e Beach I didn’t have a tripod so I put the camera down on some mossy rocks and used the timer to fire off 3 exposures.  I didn’t quite eliminate the blown-out highlights in my exposures but I didn’t want to be a drag on the group and spend a bunch of time fooling with the camera.  I used Photomatix to tonemap the exposures then Photoshop to play with some curves adjustments.


Off To Hawaii!

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We’re off to Hawaii and I’m I’m taking the opportunity to post an iPhone snapshot of my wife and daughter in the airport waiting for our flight. I’m posting via inflight wifi and typing in the WordPress app with one hand on my iPhone (my wife’s coffee in the other). I honestly don’t know how it’s going to look with respect to photo size, etc. — I’ve never used the app to write any posts before.

Little Eden slept for hours while we waited for our (delayed) flight then woke up as we pulled away from the gate. Nancy fed her as we gained altitude so her ears could pop and she’s been a perfect angel ever since. What a sweetheart!

My friend Jim Nix at http://nomadicpursuits.com has been doing a lot of iphoneography lately and this is a perfect post to call that out and point you to his blog.

Hope this post turns out alright..