Posts tagged “handheld

St. John’s Chapel, Tower of London

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St. John's Chapel, Tower of London

There’s something amazing about a building which is still standing after nearly 1000 years.  This is St. John’s Chapel in the White Tower…in the Tower of London.  This image is from 3 handheld exposures — part HDR, part composite.  The dynamic range was extreme here with the dark shadows and the bright light streaming in the windows.

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Cour Napoleon

Cour Napoleon, The Louvre, Paris

[Update: By popular demand I cropped the original image (which is now at the bottom of the post) to remove the railing.  Once I did that crop, I really felt like the fountain was too close to the edge of the frame so I cropped that out too.  Hated to lose it, but it needed to go.  I also used Lightroom’s healing brush to get rid of a few heads and such which were on the edge of the frame due to the crop.  Finally, I cropped out the top of the sky to get an aspect ratio I liked and added a touch of vignette.  If I were reworking this image I’d probably do some cloning in the sky to make it “fit” better on the edges of the frame but I’m not going to go through that effort for this shot.  Thanks everyone for the input!]

My wife and I are planning a trip this summer with three of our older girls.  We haven’t settled on a destination yet but in the process of thinking about  the upcoming trip I couldn’t help but reminisce about our trip to Paris two years ago.  I would happily go to Paris again — so many things I didn’t get to see last time (and so many I’d like to see again).

I took the shot above (an HDR processed from three handheld exposures) on our first day in Paris.  This one is almost impressionist in feel.  The edges are soft and I only partially masked in some of the ghosted people from the various exposure.  It would be unacceptable as a print but makes a nice, moody image when viewed at the appropriate size (smallish).

Cour Napoleon, Paris


Sky Interrupted

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5469837521/

Sky Interrupted (10mm, f/13, 1/125s)

I decided to process something different today. This shot of the “bean” — more properly known as the Cloud Gate in Chicago’s Millenium Park — is unique to me because of the way it interrupts the sky. It almost appears as if some weird time/space warp is going on. I also liked the gradients in the sky and the sky’s reflection in the bean. The original exposures were taken during our family’s annual trip to downtown Chicago last fall.

This image is a 2-exposure handheld HDR which was tonemapped in Photomatix then brought into Photoshop for masking and curves. Lots of masking and curves…and a little sharpening thrown in as well. The people were moving which presented some challenges…lots of masking. I did not add any saturation or other color mods other than what curves does.

I mentioned the gradients in the sky and it may appear that those are an artifact of the tonemapping step. Us HDR fanatics have all seen (and processed) images with various kinds of halos around objects. However, the original exposures contained these gradients/halos as well (one of the original exposures is shown below).

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5470424900/in/photostream/

Original Exposure


The Organ of Saint-Sulpice

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Pipe Organ in Saint-Sulpice Church in Paris

(HDR from 3 handheld exposures)

In my old age I’ve come to love classical music over anything else.  If I *had* to pick, I’d say that Vivaldi’s cello concertos are my favorite in the genre.  Another favorite piece is Handel’s Organ Concerto #13.

I think pipe organs are pretty cool and I love to here them in person.  A few years back we attended a wedding in a huge San Antonio church and the beautiful organ was used for preludes as guests arrived.  Quite enjoyable…

My wife and I were fortunate enough to listen to an organ recital at Saint-Sulpice Church in Paris (organ is pictured above).  There are regular Sunday afternoon recitals which are typically performed by an American organist named Daniel Roth.  There is another organist who occasionally plays and we never did find out who was playing that day.  The organ is approximately 150 years old and is nearly the same now as when it was first installed (an electric blower being the most significant addition).

The church itself is quite amazing.  The current building was mostly constructed in the late 17th and early 18th centuries.  However, even the today the church is technically not finished as one tower was replaced in the late 18th century but its planned twin was never built (an old mismatching tower remains).  Saint-Sulpice is comparable in size to Notre Dame Cathedral (barely smaller) and we found it just as interesting inside.  The image below gives a view of one small portion of the interior.

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Saint-Sulpice Church Interior