Posts tagged “glass

Where Everybody Knows Your Name

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6968461368/in/photostream

Cheers! 17mm, f/10, 6 exp, ISO 100

Had lunch at the basement bar in Cheers on Beacon Street in Boston — the inspiration for the TV show and the place you see when they would show the outside shots.  It was a tiny little place and spots at the bar were coveted but I happened to come in at just the right time to get a spot.  There was also an upstairs bar which mimics the set of the show but frankly the room had none of the feel of what the show looked like…not very impressive.  Downstairs was the place to be.  While waiting for my food I set the camera on the bar and fired off some brackets.  Even though I used f/10 the DOF is really shallow due to the close focus distance.  I didn’t want super long shutter times given the movement of the bartender and the people seated on the other side.  f/10 was a decent balance (I shot brackets at f/4 and f/22 also and later picked what I liked the best).

In the gift shop they had this infant onesy.  Pretty funny when you think of the words to the theme song.


Colorful Fish of the Sea, Boston

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6962541674/in/photostream

Fish of the Sea, Boston 17mm, f/6.3, ISO 200

The sea and seafood are big attractions in Boston and for most of my meals during my visit I’ve tried to get some sort of fish and/or chowder.  Fitting with a seaside theme, I discovered this bit of art near the Boston Harbor Hotel on Atlantic Ave. while walking back to my car the other night.  In hindsight I should have taken a close-up shot of how this was constructed.  Essentially, it was made of a bazillion rough pieces of colored glass / acrylic — rather cool IMO.  I found the colors and the glow on the sidewalk rather interesting as well.  Oddly enough, I had walked right past this in the daylight and didn’t notice it at all.  After dark, however, it was very prominent.  Maybe some of you have seen this before but I hadn’t and that gave me the perfect excuse to post it — something out of the ordinary from Boston.

I used a tone mapped version of the image to get the sidewalk portion then (mostly) masked in the underwater scene from one of the original exposures.  I shot at ISO 200 because with ISO 100 I could never quite complete my exposures before people walked across the scene.  I had a thought to purposely catch passers-by at various shutter speeds but it had been a long day and I was ready to get back to my hotel.  Next time…


Shattered Reflections…and Curves Adjustment Layers

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6907108389/in/photostream

Shattered Reflection 50mm, f/5.6, 1/25s, ISO 400

My daughter and I were on a walk in downtown Austin today and ran across this shattered glass in a door.  I snapped a shot of my reflected portrait.  I had a mind to see what I could bring out of it using Photoshop’s curves layers.  I knew from past experience that curves could do some cool stuff to images like this.

The images at the bottom of the post were taken inside the decommissioned Seaholm Power Plant in Austin (posts about that here and here and here).  The blown-out spots in the original image are from bright daylight coming in through windows on the opposite side of the building.  Inspired by David Nightingale’s tutorials on creating dramatic images, I experimented with all sorts of wacky curves and masks.  With some of those wacky curves adjustments the blown-out spots really created problems so in the end I just cropped them out.  The final image is rather abstract — the hand is obvious but the camera, tripod, and my body are there but not completely obvious.  There are a few issues (knuckles on the hand for example) but it’s fun nonetheless.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6900307241/in/photostream

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6900304467/in/photostream/

Seaholm Power Plant Door, after curves adjustments

Back to the images at the top of the post.  You may already know that curves adjustments can cause a color shift depending on the blend mode of the layer.  I took advantage of this to bring out a bunch of color in this image.  It would have been nice if I’d been wearing something other than a black jacket but I didn’t exactly plan this in advance.  The adjustments on this image were just a strong s-curve and a combination of curves which lightened/darkened the midtones — all in normal blend mode and masked a bit here and there.  Some selective sharpening, noise reduction, and a small bit of overall saturation were added.