Posts tagged “friend

Family Portraits…Another Lesson Learned

(Mostly Salvaged) Family Portrait

As much as I don’t want to post my mistakes — especially the really stupid ones — they can be helpful to look back on and point out to others.  It depends on the natural light situation of course, but in a portrait like the one above I often use a single strobe through, or reflected from, an umbrella placed above-camera.  This may be to provide a catchlight in the eyes, a bit of fill in the eye sockets, some overall light, or all of the above.  I occasionally use a bare strobe (well, sometimes with a gel but no other modifiers) to give a hint of a rim light on the shoulders to help separate the subjects from the background. My daughter typically holds this in position behind the subjects when I use it.  During a recent family portrait shoot on the grounds of the Texas Capitol I pulled a real boneheaded move with this light.

Just before we shot the pose above (which fortunately wasn’t the “preferred” pose) I got my rim light strobe out of the bag and quickly tested that everything was working (flash on, remote trigger operational, my guesstimated manual power set).  All was well so I dropped it in the grass and we set to arranging people and reminding the kids not to watch the squirrels running around.  We shot a bunch of frames to make sure we caught everyone looking their best-ish and moved on to our next pose.  I had decided not to use the rim light because the separation from the background seemed fine.

To my horror, when I loaded the pics up on the computer at home, I noticed that all the shots of this pose had a bright light in the grass and two of the subjects were lit like they were being blasted by the sun.  Well, they *were* being blasted — by my portable sun as you see in the picture below.  I had left it turned on and the trigger active…probably at 1/4 power.  Oops.  I couldn’t believe I had not noticed this while chimping my test shots.  My (young) daughters didn’t point it out — one didn’t even notice and the other assumed that I intended to use the flash that way.

Needless to say it was a big mistake.  While this was not the ideal pose we wanted to keep one from this set.  I was fortunate enough to have a reasonable fixable frame in the bunch so I went to work.  Switched a head, toned down some of the effects from the misplaced strobe, and made the other usual edits.  I believe the photo *is* completely salvageable given enough effort and time and I may work on it for practice in the future.

Lesson learned.  Chimp and look around the *whole* frame — Check everything…check again.

Unedited Frame


“Dad, we want pictures…but NOT a photoshoot”

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/4817082188/

Friends

As I progress in the development of my photography skills I’ve found myself becoming more of a perfectionist.  Now, that doesn’t mean that I never keep or show something that I is imperfect — I’d have no images left if I were so picky.  What it does mean is that I take more care when framing and setting up a shot, more care with the light, and more care in post-processing.  I also find myself asking people, “Don’t tell anyone I took that picture” because I know I could’ve done better on many shots.

My children are painfully aware of this because I’m never happy with the family shots we take and often want to spend a bunch of time getting things “right”.  For example, even when the light is reasonable, I want to get the strobe out just in case I need to tweak the shot and add some fill…and so it goes.

So, this past Sunday my girls wanted some pictures taken with a friend who was visiting for the week.  They were in their Sunday best and thought it would be a good opportunity to get some pictures before they changed clothes.  They were very clear that they didn’t want a “photoshoot” and frankly would have been content to use the point-and-shoot to snap some quickies.

In the end we compromised.  I didn’t get the strobe and umbrella out but I did get them to allow some test shots and tweaks before taking the final shots.  I wanted to explore backgrounds around the yard but I let them pick the spot as long as they weren’t in the sun.  They got to pose themselves and I just tweaked them here and there.

Above is one of the resulting images.  If I were constrained to that background but had my way otherwise, I would have stopped down a hair to darken the background in-camera.  Then I would have added just enough strobe and/or reflectors to bring the exposure of the faces back to normal and provide some fill/catchlights in the eyes.  In reality though, this image already exceeded the expectations of the girls and that’s what really counts.  I don’t even mind telling people that I took these pictures.


Hamilton Pool

Located west of Austin, TX (about 20 miles from downtown as the crow flies), Hamilton Pool is a favorite swimming hole for many Austin-area residents.  It’s formed at the point where Hamilton Creek pours over a 50 foot waterfall into an incredible grotto.

Jim Nix (http://www.nomadicpursuits.com) invited me to go shoot at the pool this weekend.  I’ve lived in Austin for 19 years, 9months, and some-odd days and I had never been to Hamilton Pool.  Because of this fact (and of course because Jim’s a great guy) I took him up on the invite and had a great time going after some images.  Got a bit of exercise too.

You can see Jim in the photo below.  I saw him standing near the falls and I plopped down my tripod right where I was to capture an image which included him.  I had seen incredible images of this pool but they didn’t have anything as a reference point to convey the true size.  Including a person in the frame gives the viewer a real sense of how big this grotto is.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/4416990178/

Hamilton Pool (click on image to view large)

3-exposure HDR, center exposure 18mm  f/14, 1/2s, ISO 100

On the drive out the skies were looking promising for HDR (lots of texture) but by the time we were there and set up they seemed to have turned almost to plain, gray overcast.  I didn’t end up with decent skies in any of the shots I’ve processed at so far.

I’m not super happy with any of the images so far but they’re good enough for me to at least enjoy them.  I was on a semi-strict timeline that day but I came away with some angles I’d like to explore further on my next visit.  My hope is to visit again on a *partly* sunny day (want some awesome clouds to include in the shots).  I would also like to visit in the spring when there are some leaves on the (currently bare) trees.

Here’s another shot of Jim working on some compositions.  The foreground is busy with all those branches but I still like the shot because of how the focal length compresses Jim and the falls in the frame.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/4416214337/

Jim Shooting The Falls At Hamilton Pool (click to view large)

3-exposure HDR, center exposure 70mm f/20, 1/2s, ISO 100

And one more, a spot along the creek with some interesting water, trees, and reflections.  I might have played with more angles here if it were not for my schedule.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/4416971734/

Hamilton Creek Below Hamilton Pool (click to view large)

3-exposure HDR, center exposure 24mm f/13, 1/13s, ISO 100