Posts tagged “cto

One More Sleep ‘Til Christmas

Christmas Portrait

Christmas Portrait

Our traditional Christmas Eve consists of consuming a meal of assorted sausages, cheeses, and crackers while watching Muppet Christmas Carol.  We always have a fire going in the fireplace no matter the weather — it’s usually cool enough.  The final hidden presents are wrapped and placed around the Christmas tree and all go to bed with great anticipation.

This year my wife had Christmas pajamas for all the “littles” (some of which are growing to be “middles”).  She asked me to take a photo of the kids just before bedtime and the result is shown above.  I shot from (roughly) the kids’ eye level and used either manual or shutter-priority mode (can’t remember) with a 1/4 CTO gel’ed flash bounced off the wall/ceiling behind me.  In the upper left hand corner you can see the well-lit wall reflected in our glass doors.  Had this been a more “official” shot I would have switched angles, bounced the flash over my other shoulder, etc. in order to minimize the bright reflections.  The littlest one only has so much patience though so we to fire off some shots and call it a day.

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Jesus Loves The Little Children

The Line 70mm, f/6.3, 1/200s, ISO 200, flash

I’m sticking with the pool theme for this post.  We recently were invited to swim at a friend’s pool (cheers all around from the kids) and I decided to lug the camera along to get some pictures.  It was 5pm and the sun was high in the sky.  Fortunately when the kids were on the diving board the sun was slightly behind — meaning that if I could manage to get *enough* light reflected off the kids’ faces it would at least be *even-ish* light.  Coming up with that light — while saving the background somewhat — was the first challenge then.

Belly Flop!!! 70mm, f/6.3, 1/500s, ISO 200, flash (high speed sync)

The next challenge was the huge dynamic range in the skin tones.  In the song “Jesus Loves The Little Children” the line goes “Red and yellow, black and white, they are precious in His sight”.  We didn’t have “yellow” but we had red, black, and white figuratively speaking.  If you light for the lightest skin the darkest skin might be way too underexposed.  Expose for the darkest skin and the lightest gets completely blown out in the bright sunlight.  The challenge was to maintain the best balance in the situation — via my camera and flash settings.

(Most of) the Gang 70mm, f/4.5, 1/200s, ISO 200, flash

My gear: Canon 5D mkii, Canon 70-200mm f/2.8 L, and Canon 580exii flash gel’ed with a 1/4 CTO.  I started out using shutter speeds of 1/200 to 1/250s to stay within the sync speed of the flash.  This was reasonable for much of the action and gave me quite a bit of flash power, which I needed when shooting from these distances (50’+).  Remember that the light follows the inverse square law — double the distance and you are only left with 1/4 the light.  Later I switched to using high-speed sync which allowed shutter speeds up to 1/500s to freeze the action but reduces the power that the flash can put out.  Both methods were effective in their own way.  With the 5D mkii I also had ISO as a lever.  I didn’t want to go too high with it (but I did use up to 3200 some of the time).  A higher ISO also reduces the need for so much flash power but you pay in noise.  Note that sometimes when using flash in bright light you *can’t* go very high with the ISO because the flash sync speed is a “long” shutter speed (relative to the overall brightness in the scene) and is allowing a lot of light to hit the sensor. In summary, I can’t tell you what the “best” settings are for a situation you might be shooting, but hopefully I’ve given you enough info to jump start your thoughts and get you experimenting with it.  Keep in mind that in the evening the light changes rapidly so you’ll have to adjust for that as well.

Jump! 70mm, f/6.3, 1/320s, ISO 200, flash (high speed sync)

In Lightroom I still had to use an adjustment brush to even out the exposure of the faces a bit (in most pictures).  All in all, I was very happy with the way they turned out.  The important parts of the backgrounds were preserved and the kids are exposed well enough.  There’s always plenty of room for improvement though.


Happy Ever After

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720261111/in/photostream/

Last month some of my family attended the wedding of my niece Jessica in Seattle.  We would love to take the whole family to events like that but it’s just not practical in our case.  The weather was what one might expect in Seattle — highs around 50 and wet.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720214321/in/photostream

Cold, Wet, Raining

I was asked to do some photography during the times when the paid photographer wasn’t around — rehearsal, early wedding morning — and grab a few extra pics at the reception.  I had just acquired a Canon 5D Mark ii the day before we traveled and I got to try out its capabilities over the weekend.  It has amazing low-light performance and I took full advantage of that.

Here are some pics from the weekend (here’s a link to one I already posted of the rings resting in the flowers).  Some are just OK from a technical standpoint but are personally meaningful or interesting to our family.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720765354/in/photostream/

Girls Going Out

The shot below was meant to focus on the ring (and it does) but it isn’t the greatest shot.  However, I still like the general feel of it — soft light, very shallow depth of field so I included it.  It was taken in passing as I wasn’t focused on taking pictures at that point.  I’d love to have that opportunity again though.  I’d get the ring hand fully in the shot, shoot from slightly higher to entirely fill the background with Jessica’s to-do list on the poster board while keeping the nail polish bottle fully in the frame as in this shot.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720221617/in/photostream/

Early Wedding Prep

Some pics from the rehearsal:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720260405/in/photostream/

Can You Spot The Happy Bride-To-Be?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720785930/in/photostream/

Parents and Grandparents of the Bride

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720228863/in/photostream/

Think Dad's Nervous Already?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720804346/in/photostream/

Final Instructions

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720228057/in/photostream/

Coaching For The Big Kiss

The wedding coordinator was concerned that the main photog wouldn’t arrive at the house early enough to get pictures of the miscellany like the rings, flower, shoes, etc. so she asked me to get some shots.  Here are a few I came away with besides the ring shot:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720809690/in/photostream/

Wedding "Stuff"

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720809396/in/photostream/

Wedding Bouquets

Pre-wedding pictures in church:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720818074/in/photostream/

Group Photos...Look At The Camera

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720261111/in/photostream/

Group Photo

After the ceremony the wedding coordinator again commandeered me for a photo assignment.  The hired photog was covering the bride and groom’s trip through the receiving line from a vantage point near the church doors.  I was asked to cover near the end of the line and I’m glad I did — look at how happy they are!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720826064/in/photostream/

Just Married!!!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720826418/in/photostream/

Off To The Reception

During the reception I didn’t capture all that many shots but here are a few.  Light was challenging in the reception hall.  Bouncing flash was not that great (note the black ceilings) and I didn’t have 3 remote flashes on stands like the hired photog did.  I still like the shots even with some of the shadows.  I take comfort in knowing that there wasn’t a whole lot to be done without setting up extra lighting myself.  I just kept a diffuser on the flash and pointed the flash either up and slightly forward or up and slightly behind me.  As the night was winding down, Jessica asked me to take a picture of her with the bridesmaids up near the dance floor.  I like how the light ended up just fine with the exception of how everyone’s hair disappears into the background.  I didn’t have a second light to overcome that.   When we walked to the front and lined up everyone and their brother got cameras out and started firing.  Getting all the girls to look at me rather than the other cameras was a bit like herding cats.  None of the shots had everyone looking normal so I just picked the best of the bunch.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720830864/in/photostream/

Bride and Bridesmaids Impromptu

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720837158/in/photostream/

Toast

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720280297/in/photostream/

My In-laws On The Dance Floor

A candid of my beautiful wife.  When she finds out her picture is here I’ll probably be in trouble.  She never reads my posts so please — none of you go telling her.  She never needs to know 🙂

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720287605/in/photostream/

My Beautiful Wife

The main photog had already left the reception when Jessica and Jonathan were making their exit so once again the coordinator asked me to take shots.  I had the 50mm lens on and there was no time to fetch my 24-70 or really test out the flash to adjust compensation.  I’d prefer a little different framing but I was zoomed out (with my feet) as far back as I could get and I wanted to catch some of the flag waving too.  I got off 4 frames as they walked out and they capture the moment just fine.  There was very heavy tungsten lighting in this little hallway.  My flash was gel’ed with a 1/4 CTO and I could get away with cooling the color temperature more but I decided not to eliminate it completely.  It’s a dilemma I often struggle with — Whether to keep some of that uncorrected color in certain shots.  It can be a nice effect sometimes.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5720845040/in/photostream/

Off To Married Life!


Strobist Photo Shoot…with special guests Joe McNally and David Hobby

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5560312614/

Practicing Portraits With Strobes 125mm, f/8, 1/250s, ISO 100

Last Friday evening I joined Alex Suarez, Steve Wampler, and Sylvia Brogdon for an impromptu photo shoot outside the Palmer Events Center.  They had just spent the day in the Flash Bus seminar put on by Joe McNally and David Hobby and wanted to practice what they’d learned to help cement it in their minds.  I was not able to attend the Flash Bus event but I wanted to join in and learn what I could and get some practice myself.  Our models were “Eight” and my daughter Evelyn.  The location was the grounds of the Palmer Events Center in Austin, TX.  It has many architectural features which lend themselves to unique portrait settings and there are different backgrounds to choose from on each side of the building.

As we got started, Steve talked about how David Hobby “lights in layers”.  This is the process of building your setup one light at a time.  Assuming a fixed shutter speed (at or below your max sync speed), start by picking the aperture which gives you the ambient light exposure you desire.  The correct exposure is quite subjective of course — just find the one *you* want.  You can darken the background somewhat or allow it to blow out.  Next, add your main light and get it to the f-stop you want and in position.  Finally, add fill as necessary and maybe even a rim light to light the hair or shoulders if you want.

We stuck with one or two lights and assisted each other by holding lights as we took turns shooting. I actually have as much fun helping with the shoot as I do taking the photographs and always enjoy the company too.  We started out near the southwest corner of the building — very challenging due to the setting sun.  The positive side of a situation like this is that it forces you think about solutions to the light problems, some of which equate to just going with it and trying to make interesting images with the light that is there, be it harsh or soft.  The image at the top of the post was taken here with my daughter standing in the shadow of a large pillar.  Shooting someone with very dark skin provides additional challenges as you need extra light to balance out the ambient and bring out the facial features.  This extra light blows out light clothes (had that happen a lot) and sometimes other features like the pillar next to her.  I shot in manual mode at 1/250s (max sync speed), did a few test shots without the strobe to pick my aperture (f/8) then began experimenting with light position and power.  This shot had a strobe camera right, bare other than a 1/4 CTO gel, triggered with Elinchrom Skyports.  I used my 70-200mm f/2.8 IS for all the portraits (love that lens for these situations).

We moved to the northwest corner of the build for a bit and I got the shot below.  No strobe used in this portrait.  Alex used a silver reflector to direct the sunlight to Evelyn’s face and I shot from down low to get a reasonable background.  Aperture priority was used with an f-stop of f/4.  The light was literally golden even off the silver reflector — made her skin look great.

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5565935278/

Sun-lit Portrait 165mm, f/4, 1/750s, ISO 100

Another mass migration of gear and bodies occurred as we relocated to the north side of the building.  There was great shade and many choices for backgrounds including the Austin skyline.  I shot this final portrait (below) at this location.  I chose an aperture of f/9.5 and set up two lights.  The main light was again a 1/4 CTO gel’ed bare strobe at camera right.  The fill was a bare strobe (I didn’t have tape or velcro for another gel) placed on the ground in front of the camera.  I placed the strobes on different Skyport channels and experimented with each separately to adjust them to taste.  I had to lay out on the ground (see the pic by Alex Suarez at the bottom of the post) to get the composition I wanted (Evelyn + The Austonian + TX flag).  I was somewhat limited due the angle required for my composition and the locations of some trees which blocked the flag if I moved out of this position.  I would have liked the wind to blow the flag up a bit more but I took what I could get.  Someday I’ll work on perfecting this shot.  I would try two things for starters: (1) use a shoot-through umbrella with an assistant (no assistant was handy for this shot and it was too windy to set it up without an anchor) and (2) try a stronger CTO gel to warm up the subject to match the background better.  I prefer the darker backgrounds but I think I’d experiment with backing off to f/8 or even f/7.1.

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5562631905/

Portrait With Austin Skyline 75mm, f/9.5, 1/250s, ISO 100

After shooting the skyline portrait, Sylvia and I were helping Steve shoot portraits of my daughter.  In a moment of serendipity, Joe McNally and David Hobby walked out of the building.  Our group bantered with them and Joe made a smiling comment on the order of “good luck with that portrait” as their group walked to a spot nearby.  After a minute or so he and David Hobby just couldn’t stand watching us flounder so they came over, gave a few tips, and Joe McNally even held the strobe/umbrella for a couple of shots.  That was cool.  I think they took pity on us in the same way that we would a distressed animal — you just can’t stand watching it suffer 🙂

I had a lot of fun shooting with these folks and my daughter had a blast being the model (she’s asking to do it again).  Hopefully soon…

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5562617915/

Shooting the Skyline Portrait (photo by Alex Suarez)