Posts tagged “chicago

The Bean – 2012

Cloud Gate On A Rainy Evening

Cloud Gate On A Rainy Evening

My family and I try to get to downtown Chicago every year and we almost always visit the Cloud Gate (aka “The Bean”) in Millennium Park.  We take goofy pictures in the reflections and pictures of other people taking goofy pictures of themselves.  The shot above was taken at the end of our last visit to Chicago.  It was cold and rainy but we were prepared with jackets, umbrellas, and a rain cover for the camera bag.   The forecast for the day was sunny and warm early, turning to cold and rainy in the afternoon and for once the weatherman was completely correct.  The shots below were only taken 5-ish hours earlier in the day.  I liked how the blown-out sky and top of the bean blend together in the last shot.  Someday I’ll get through all the photos and post some of the goofy ones.

The Bean Earlier In Day

The Bean Earlier In Day

Sky Blends With Sculpture

Sky Blends With Sculpture

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Buckingham Fountain

Buckingham Fountain

Buckingham Fountain

While in Chicago a couple of months back I hoped to get some sunset pictures of Buckingham Fountain in Grant Park.  Instead I got cloudy sky shots as it began to rain.  Earlier in the day the sun was shining brightly on a 80-ish degree day.  By late afternoon cold winds were blowing and it began to rain.  We were prepared since this was precisely the weather forecast we had been hearing.  However, I had held out hope that the transition from sunshine to clouds would occur more near sunset so that I’d be able to capture something dramatic with the fountain.  It wasn’t meant to be.

I was able to get some shots off quickly before the rain got too heavy but I was very limited on my composition options due to the seemingly millions of white tents and blue porta-potties set up nearby in preparation for the Chicago Marathon which was being held a few days later.  I chose to post an image without all that stuff, but unfortunately that meant not posting the best view of the fountain either.

Nothing fancy on the processing — Lightroom tweaks.


Da Bears!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/8075776043/in/photostream

Monday Night Football

I had no idea until now that I haven’t posted in almost two months…I have had zero time for photography and blogging…for all sorts of reasons.  I knew it had been a “long time” but not this long.  I finally log in to WordPress and find some of the formatting changed, all sorts of cool posts from others that I’ve managed to miss, and oddly enough — I’m getting more hits on the blog than when I left (not that I’m all into that, but it’s interesting nonetheless). My top posts every week are still the Domke F2 review and the Hill Country Wedding.  Interesting.

Having grown up a Chicago Bears fan I jumped on the opportunity to go to the Bears vs. Cowboys game last week Monday.  Given the insane cost I’m not likely to do that again anytime soon unless I win the lottery…and I don’t play the lottery.  It was a fun time with my son, daughter, and some friends.

The picture I’m posting today was taken with the trusty Canon S90 that I purchased from my friend Mike Connell.  Yeah, I know there’s almost nothing related to the Bears in the photo except that this is where they were playing…oh well.  I’m finding the S90 pretty handy for situations like this — where I either don’t want to lug a big camera around or they aren’t allowed yet I still want some manual control over the exposures.  Cowboys Stadium has a 3″ lens rule so I’m sure I could have brought my DSLR in with certain lenses.  However, I don’t want to risk the hassle of walking up with a DLSR and being told mine isn’t allowed — then what?  Argue with them and maybe win but if I lose I have to haul it back to the car, risk having people see me lock it up in the car, etc.  The S90 will do just fine…


Michigan Avenue Bridge

People strolling early in the morning on the Michigan Avenue bridge over the Chicago River.  This was taken just as the sun was peeking up over the Lake Michigan horizon and the light was a deep orange.  The sun’s rays had a straight shot down the river — unimpeded by skyscrapers — so the bridge managed to catch the best light.


Squished Portrait

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6738817263/in/photostream

Squished Portrait 20mm, f/6.7, 1/20s, ISO 200

Another quick one in this post…still really busy.  The Cloud Gate sculpture in Chicago (aka “The Bean”) is just like a fun house mirror with infinite possibilities as far as my children are concerned.  We took a lot of group/self portraits on our last visit to Millennium Park and I’m sure this won’t be the last one I post.  I put this one through all sorts of tweaks in Lightroom in an attempt to highlight the subjects (us) and to bring out the various fingerprints, dirt, streaks, and distortion on the sculpture.  I pulled the image into Photoshop and tweaked some colors here and there (to mute them a bit).  I used Topaz Adjust to do some wild-ish things on a duplicate layer and blended that into most of the image at about 30% opacity.  Finally I used selective (via masks) sharpening and noise reduction to touch it up.


Sky Interrupted

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5469837521/

Sky Interrupted (10mm, f/13, 1/125s)

I decided to process something different today. This shot of the “bean” — more properly known as the Cloud Gate in Chicago’s Millenium Park — is unique to me because of the way it interrupts the sky. It almost appears as if some weird time/space warp is going on. I also liked the gradients in the sky and the sky’s reflection in the bean. The original exposures were taken during our family’s annual trip to downtown Chicago last fall.

This image is a 2-exposure handheld HDR which was tonemapped in Photomatix then brought into Photoshop for masking and curves. Lots of masking and curves…and a little sharpening thrown in as well. The people were moving which presented some challenges…lots of masking. I did not add any saturation or other color mods other than what curves does.

I mentioned the gradients in the sky and it may appear that those are an artifact of the tonemapping step. Us HDR fanatics have all seen (and processed) images with various kinds of halos around objects. However, the original exposures contained these gradients/halos as well (one of the original exposures is shown below).

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5470424900/in/photostream/

Original Exposure


Self Portrait #1

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5076644217/

Self Portrait #1 15mm, f/6.7, 1/350s, ISO 200

 

I’m pretty shy about getting my picture taken and am rarely happy with any pictures I’m in.  However, inspired by other photographers, I occasionally attempt a self-portrait.  Every attempt has ended up in the trash.  I don’t even save the original files because they’re so bad.  I’ve always got some goofy look, fake smile, or crinkled forehead (those who know me are saying “That’s how you really always look!”).

I did save this self-portrait though.  It was taken in the “bean” as the Cloud Gate sculpture in Chicago’s Millennium Park is affectionately known.  I tried it just for fun and it *is* fun IMO to look at yourself all distorted, etc.  One doesn’t expect to look good in a photo like this. That’s reason #1 why I kept this one.  Reason #2 is that little girl with the camera in the background.  Cute.

My kids love the bean.  When we returned home my wife asked the kids how they liked their trip.  For the 3-year old it wasn’t the walk through the city, or the overnight stay in a nice downtown hotel.  His response?  “I touched the bean!”.

The processing was relatively straight forward.  Slight tweaks to basic exposure and clarity in Lightroom then off to Photoshop.  My first thought was to go really edgy with it using Topaz Adjust but once I got in there I found that it also brought out too much of the dirt and fingerprints on the bean.  What I settled on was the original exposure from Lightroom with a Topaz Adjusted version of myself masked in at 50% (ish) opacity.  A small curves adjustment finished it off.

More bean photos to follow at some future date.


Chicago River Sunrise

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5042745675/

Chicago River Sunrise Center exposure: 10mm, f/8, 1/6s ISO 100

 

Most of my family still lives in the Chicago area so we make a yearly trek to IL.  As part of this year’s trip I took some of my family on an overnight visit to downtown Chicago.   Life has kept me from being able to spend much time on photography but I had hopes of doing some “serious” photography in the city this year.  I figured that being on vacation would allow some time for pics but the highest priority was spending time with the kids and that’s what I mostly did.  I did manage some shots but really couldn’t spend time composing or trying different vantage points.

That said, I snuck out of the hotel room at sunrise and headed toward Michigan Avenue.  I caught a glimpse of the orange light of the early morning sun on the Trump Tower from a block away so I picked up the pace and walked to the Chicago River a block east of Michigan Ave.  In order to get the composition I wanted I had to set up the camera on one of the pillars of the stone wall above the river.  I was a bit nervous about that but just moved with caution to avoid knocking everything over the wall.

There are several things I like about this shot.  The orange glow of the Trump Tower was just right.  I liked how the wide-angle lens makes the buildings on either side of the river lean as if they’re getting ready for a cross-river showdown.  Finally, I’m partial to Chicago and therefore just think any downtown shot in the city looks cool.  I hope you like it too.

As for processing, this shot started life as a 4-exposure HDR (-4, -2, 0, +2).  Three exposures were nearly sufficient but I needed the -4 exposure to tame the reflective highlights at the bottom of the Trump Tower.  I brought the tonemapped image into Photoshop with the four original exposures and masked pieces of each into the image.  I use Noiseware to clean up the sky.  Finally, some sharpening and curves adjustments and I was pretty much done.  I had intended to play around with Topaz Adjust to see what I came up with but I never got around to that…maybe I’ll have some fun with that in the future.

Here’s a daytime shot of the Trump Tower.  As you can see, there’s no orange in that building at all — the morning sun was simply *that* orange.

 

Trump Tower

 

 


Sweet Home Chicago

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/4711658498/

On approach to O'Hare Airport...en route to Paris

(Many years ago) I was born on the south side of the Windy City in the Roseland neighborhood.  My family moved to the south suburbs when I was pretty young, then out to a rural area (still close to the city) in high school.  I went to lots of Blackhawks games in Chicago Stadium, Sox (and Sting) games at Comiskey Park, and even managed one Cubs game at Wrigley.  Incidentally, I never made it to a Bears game — haven’t ever been to a pro football game to this day.

I remember watching Stan Mikita, Pit Martin, and Keith Magnuson play for the Hawks.  I loved Sox players like Chet Lemon (when I was really young), Harold Baines, and Carlton Fisk.  I had a home run ball hit by Brian Downing back in the 70’s.  I wasn’t actually at the game and honestly don’t remember if he played for the Sox or the Angels at the time.  I was at the 1983 game where the Sox *could have* clinched the division but they needed a win or loss from someone else so they didn’t clinch until the following night…something like that.  I watched every game of the Bears run up to the Super Bowl in 1985 — what a fun season.  I practically worshipped Karl-Heinz Granitza of the Chicago Sting.

I wasn’t big into autographs but I had Harold Baines, Walter Payton (got that one at the auto show in McCormick Place), and Johnny Morris (got his in the stands at Comiskey Park the same day I got Baines’).

Although I now live in Texas, the rest of my family still lives in the Chicago area and downtown Chicago is pretty much a yearly destination for our family.  We take the Metra in to the Randolph station from the south side, walk the streets, and take in whatever attractions we feel like that visit.  The kids love it.  I haven’t visited since really getting into photography but I’m really looking forward to it.  [Side note: One member of the family lives in Milwaukee but we Chicagoans simply consider that a suburb…those of you from Chicago appreciate this I’m sure]

The picture above was taken as my wife and I were landing at O’Hare en route to Paris.  I grabbed the camera a bit late and missed some better shots but I’m still pleased with this one — reminds me of home.


Photography Takes Me To Places I’ve Never Been

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/4390789111/

House Above Lady Bird Lake

One of the fun things about photography is exploring new places and taking time to see new viewpoints.  Diving deeper into photography this past year has caused me to view old places in a new way and visit new places that I wish I had seen years ago.  An example of the former would be the Texas State Capitol building.  I’ve been there many, many times in the 20 years I’ve lived in Austin but never took a picture there until 2 months ago.  An example of the latter would be the cliffs high above the Pennybacker Bridge (or “Loop 360 Bridge” to most of us locals).  What an awesome place and I can’t explain why I’ve never taken the time to visit before January of this year.

My daughter and I have been doing most of the assignments on dailyshoot.com.  I approach these in a semi-serious manner.  I want to improve my photography both in the technical aspect and the creative aspects therefore I make an attempt to come up with something original that also challenges me from a technical standpoint.  However, I have a family and can’t devote all my time to the assignments so I often compromise and complete them with a result that I’m not entirely proud of.  That’s OK though — I’m still learning in the process.

Today’s assignment was to “go somewhere today you’ve never been, even just a different street, and make a photo”.  I was headed out on a date with one of my daughters tonight and we chose Mangia Pizza on Lake Austin Blvd.  Yum.  Not quite as good as Giordano’s in Chicago but ‘yum’ nonetheless.  While pumping gas at the station next door we were looking at the incredible houses high on the cliffs above Lady Bird Lake.  As usual I had the camera stashed in the trunk so we grabbed it and walked down to Eilers Park (or Deep Eddy as many know it) to attempt a capture or two of those houses.  I’ve been to Mangia many times before…never took the time to go down to the park.

Eilers Park was built on a tract of lakefront which the City of Austin purchased from A.J. Eilers in 1935, for a price of $10,000.  According to http://www.friendsofeilerspark.org/, “Mr. Eilers and his partners had developed the property as a resort that included a spring-fed pool, a bathhouse, rental cottages, a bandstand, and concession stand.  The park had a carnival-like atmosphere with a Ferris wheel, music performances, free movies, and much, much more.”  Over the years the park deteriorated but over the past several years improvements have been completed and a master plan for new projects has been created.

The image above is an HDR generated from 3 exposures.  The light was just right.  I wanted to capture a wider scene with several of the houses on the cliff but there are plenty of power lines around.  I’m just not that good with photoshop yet and the lines would have seriously detracted from the image.  I also had to shoot above some brush in the foreground which is why the house is tight to the bottom of the frame.  I’d love to find out more about this house…someday.  For now it remains another “place I’ve never been”.