Posts tagged “50mm

Chair Abstract

Chair Abstract 50mm, f/1.4, 1/50s, ISO 200

Just like the kite photo I recently posted, this image is out of the ordinary for me — I don’t shoot many abstract or fine art types of photos.  During the week I picked up my Canon 5D mkii from being repaired [related sad story below] and yesterday got a chance to fully check it out.  I popped my 50mm f/1.4 lens on the body and started plinking.  As I sat at our little breakfast table I opened the lens up completely and started shooting through the rails of one of the chair backs.  There were a lot of colorful things in the background which were nicely blurred by the wide aperture and close focus distance.  I then started shooting while moving the camera up and down, resulting in the image above.  I rather like it.  The image is straight out of the camera except for cropping.

So the sad story is this:  This year I decided to try shooting some pictures at a fireworks show.  I’d never done it — I’d rather concentrate on *watching* the fireworks and it just seemed like a headache overall.  Before the fireworks we attended a BBQ dinner catered by the Salt Lick and as dusk fell I hauled out the camera and tripod and began getting set up.  I put my wireless remote into the cameras hot shoe, put the camera on the tripod, then proceeded to adjust the length of the tripod legs.  I heard a loud crash — my 5D mkii hitting the pavement from a height of about 5 feet.  Looking on the bright side, the camera had turned over on the way down and landed flat on the wireless remote which was in many pieces all around us.  That definitely spared me from the damage I could have had.  The camera “worked” here and there but mostly gave an error.  It would even randomly try to focus the lens — when the power switch was off!  Anyway…a couple hundred dollars later I have my camera back refurbished and sporting a new shutter box and mirror assembly.  I managed to put all the remote pieces together but it was dead as a doornail.


Gone Fishing

Rod and Reel 50mm, f/1.4

Fishing is what I’d like to be doing today…or any other day.  I’ve been quite under the weather today and am feeling sorry for myself for not being able to get out shooting photos downtown tonight with my buddy Pete Talke. Life is still good though! 🙂

Photo taken at sunrise on the beach in Port Aransas, TX with a 50mm lens @ f/1.4.


The First Starbucks

On a recent trip to Seattle my daughters and I paid a visit to the first Starbucks.  I’m not usually very interested in something like this but thought, “Hey, we were right here so we might as well do it.”.  While the place isn’t that interesting or unique when viewed as just bricks and mortar it becomes a bit more when you think of what Starbucks has become.  This location also operates in a different manner than your typical Starbucks — and that gives the place some charm.  Upon entering the door an employee welcomes you, inquires where you are from, and directs you to the next available person to take your order.  Once your order is taken, your cup is tossed across the room to the barista.  We witnessed a couple of misses…maybe they were rookies.  They were all having fun though.

Of course I had to take a few pictures.  Using my 50mm @ f/1.4, I quickly figured out an exposure and fired away.  There were a lot of people so I limited my shots a bit.  For the image at the top my hope was to frame the counter, barista, the neon “Espresso…Cappuccino” sign, and Starbucks sign such that they were all completely readable but I never quite got it.  Unlike some photographers, I’m not willing to sit there in everyone’s way, holding up the crowd, etc. just for my shot…just not that important to me.  I could have waited for an opportunity but when I’m hanging with non-photographers (especially family) I try not to push their patience *too* much by spending all day taking pictures.

I processed the image at the top with the intent to make it look rather vintage and I added some grain to top it off.  The rest were straightforward edits — basic tweaks.

You ordered HOW many shots?!?!


Seattle Skyline Snapshot

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6861448692/in/photostream

Moody Skies In Seattle 50mm, f/1.4, 1/4000s, ISO 200 – Click to view larger on Flickr

“If you own a house which faces west on an island in the Indian Ocean and your youngest sibling is left-handed and your primary vehicle is white, then subtract line 21 from line 13, multiply by 0.285, subtract your latitude and longitude and enter the result on line 85.”  What’s that got to do with anything?  I just did my income taxes and it seems like half the directions are as nonsensical as the one above.  So, I’m just venting…our tax code is too complex and MESSED UP.  It doesn’t matter what political party affiliation you claim, whether you think the system is fair or unfair, or you think the rich should pay more or less — I don’t see how anyone could disagree that it’s a mess.  Solutions?  I don’t get into those kinds of debates online 🙂

In a previous post I showed a bokeh panorama (or “bokehrama”) from the same place the above picture was taken.  The one above was a quick snapshot as we packed up to get out of the rain.  I hadn’t planned on doing much with it but as I continued to see it among my photos it grew on me — I like the overall gloomy mood contrasted with the random colors of the skyscraper windows for example.  Having a bit of detail and drama in the clouds helps too and I don’t think I would like it as much if the skies had been a flat gray.

This image is from a single frame captured with a 50mm lens.  You may note the odd settings used — not typical for a landscape shot.  The fact of the matter is that I had just used roughly the same settings for the panorama I linked to above.  For this skyline image I sped up the shutter one stop with a flick of the dial (didn’t need quite the length of exposure that I needed for my daughter’s dark skin) and snapped this quickly so we could get going.  Something like f/8 would’ve been sharper, etc. but there was no time to worry about that stuff.  I cropped to a more panoramic aspect ratio (and cropped out another visitor to the park who was in the left side of my frame) then processed mainly with a bunch of curves and masks to selectively adjust contrast.  I tweaked the white balance a bit to move from a completely black and white cast toward having a wee bit of warmth.


Seattle Skyline…Rained Out

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6840336856/in/photostream

Kerry Park, Seattle, Bokeh Panorama 50mm, f/1.4, 1/2000, ISO 200, stitched from 16 frames

My daughters and I went to downtown Seattle today to hang out and on the way we stopped in Kerry Park (thanks, Jim Nix for suggesting it).  I had low expectations regarding the weather but did hope to grab a skyline panorama in any case.  Long story short, the rains came and other visitors got in the way somewhat so all I managed was the quick, handheld bokeh panorama (from 16 frames) shown above.  I look at it as making lemonade out of lemons — we did what we could given the conditions.  I gave up on my plans for a high-res (zoomed in and in-focus) panorama since the rain was hard and blowing directly on to the lens.  We headed to lunch at Pike Place Market and afterward the clouds broke and the sun peeked out.  We headed back to Kerry Park on our way back home but by the time we got there it was raining hard again — could barely even see across the water.  I didn’t bother trying any more photos.  I may try some black and white treatments with this one someday…


More Experimentation With The Brenizer Method

Bokehrama (cropped a bit) 50mm, f/1.4, 1/400s, stitched from about 20 frames

Single Frame (cropped a bit) 50mm, f/1.4, 1/400s

I’ve just got to get out and try this bokehrama thing (see my first post on it here if you have no idea what I’m talking about) in a better setting but I’m posting this quick experiment for my friend Pete Talke (check him out here, here, and here).  At lunch today Pete was asking how this compared to just a straight shot with f/1.4 for example so I grabbed a couple of shots out in the yard to experiment.  For starters, you’ll just have to trust that my subjects were standing in the same place for each photo.  That’s not obvious given my differing position in the shots.  The top image is a bokehrama created from a stitch of almost 20 frames.  The second image is from a single frame.  Both were shot in manual mode with the same exposure @ f/1.4.  I bumped the exposure of all frames up equally but they are otherwise straight out of the camera.  I’ve made them a bit smaller in this post in hopes of allowing them to be viewed together on most screens.

I really don’t intend to scientifically analyze the shots.  I design microprocessors for a living and I get enough technical stuff at work and am not interested getting too deep into the techie stuff with photography.  Some random qualitative observations: You’ll notice that the bokehrama (top) has a wide-angle look and that’s simply because my panning around from a position close to the subject mimics what a wide-angle lens would do.  I cropped both shots to get make the subjects roughly the same size and you’ll note that the subjects in the single frame are super soft — the 50mm isn’t known for being all that sharp at f/1.4 and being cropped from a single frame it’s not a big surprise to see this.  The subject in the top image is very sharp (at least when viewed outside this post — hopefully you can see that on WordPress too).  Even if I zoom in quite a bit he’s still sharp because his image comes from a single frame where he filled much of the sensor.  Finally, with respect to the depth of field you’d be hard-pressed to get this bokeh out of many wide-angle lenses.  Note how the tree trunks have completely lost their detail in the bokehrama at the top image compared to the bottom one (which was also shot at f/1.4).

As I said, I want to try this in a different setting.  I also want to experiment with longer lenses (toward the longer end of my 70-200 f/2.8) to see what this does to the perspective and DOF.  There are probably different looks that can be achieved and your mileage may vary on how much you like it (both the bokeh effect and the wider perspective), which is of course one of the cool things about any art — it’s all subjective and personal.


Fire Dancer…Capturing Motion

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6833628735/in/photostream/

Fire Dancer 50mm, f/7.1, 1/15s, ISO 1600

My wife and I (and several in her family) attended a luau while in Hawaii last week.  I have no idea what an old traditional luau was like or how authentic the festivities were but in any case it was immensely enjoyable.  Knowing that the main show would be after dark, I fitted my camera with my 50mm f/1.4 lens.  Night photography has never been something I’ve been good at (maybe that can be said about all my photography 🙂 ).  I’m always going back and forth with myself on the best combination for getting good exposures — shutter/aperture/ISO.  Noise is always a consideration (not so much now that one of my bodies is a 5D Mkii).

For much of this show I wanted to mostly freeze the motion (like in the second shot above) so I shot in manual mode with an aperture between 1.4 and 2.8, shutter speed in the 1/500s – 1/640s range, and ISO 1600-3200 (the stage lighting varied from act to act and I tweaked settings accordingly).  Depth of field wasn’t much of an issue because my focus point was quite far.  However, I also spent time trying to capture some of the motion in the dances.  I was shooting handheld so I did have to consider that when deciding how long to open the shutter.  I played around with various shutter speeds and came out with some fun shots.  For the fire shots I had hoped to be able to reduce the exposure enough to avoid blowing out the highlights of the flames completely but in doing so I ended up underexposing everything else much more than I liked.  In the shot above I like the balance between capturing motion in the flame yet keeping some clarity in the dancer.  Some shots blurred things more (see image below) and that’s interesting in its own right but I prefer the balance in the shot at the top of the post.

Processing was quite simple for all these shots.  I shot with daylight white balance so that I effectively captured the colors consistently.  The color turned out rather well.  I used a bit of clarity and sometimes bumped the exposure up a hair in Lightroom.  Finally, I exported from Lightroom with a preset that ran the images through a noise reduction action (using Noiseware) in Photoshop.


Main Street Bethlehem

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6552403609/in/photostream

Sewing Girl, Main Street Bethlehem 50mm, f/1.4, 1/180s, ISO 3200

Each year in Burnet, TX, the First Baptist Church opens Main Street Bethlehem to the public.  The church has a permanent town of Bethlehem built near the church and for a pair of weekends it comes alive with shepherds, blacksmiths, bakers, rope makers, candle makers, tax collectors, Roman soldiers…and bazillions of visitors from all over Central Texas.  All these actors take on their full character and as you walk through the town they treat you as if you are actually in Bethlehem 2000 years ago.  They ask you if you want to buy their products, taste their bread, and “Did you hear about the Messiah?!?”.  If you try to get them out of character by talking about some modern thing they do a remarkable job of acting as if they have no idea what you’re talking about and they quiz you back with questions fitting the times.  Our children’s favorite spot in the town is the tax collector’s table.  As the townsfolk come to pay their taxes there’s the occasional person whose taxes are delinquent.  The children like to watch the Roman soldiers haul them off to jail.

Most importantly, there is a manger where Mary and Joseph hold a baby to remind us of the gift of Jesus Christ that God gave us many years ago.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6552581771/in/photostream

Baby In A Manger, Main Street Bethlehem 50mm, f/2.5, 1/60s, ISO 3200

Shooting in the low light was difficult as the 50mm f/1.4 lens has a terrible time focusing.  With the place being so crowded I really didn’t have time to fiddle around so I tried to quickly find high contrast points to focus on and snapped away in aperture priority mode.  I also used between minus 1/2 to minus 1-1/2 exposure compensation so the camera properly captured the night scenes.


Just Married!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5633273416/in/photostream

Rings and Flowers 50mm, f/2.8, 1/8s

Jonathan and Jessica (my niece) got married in Seattle this past weekend.  The flowers were going to be unavailable before the hired photographer was scheduled to arrive (I don’t remember where the flowers were headed…).  The wedding coordinator asked me to grab some pics so I placed the rings on this rose and snapped away with my 50mm lens.

I also took pictures of the bride at various stages of getting ready, at the ceremony, and at the reception but I’m not going to post any of those because she may want other pictures to go public first.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5624199149/in/photostream

Entrance, Queen Anne Baptist Church in Seattle 15mm, f/11, 1/6s, ISO 100

When we were at the wedding rehearsal I snapped this shot of the entrance of Queen Anne Baptist Church.  A single exposure was used for most of the image but I masked in a darker exposure for the lamps (blown out in the normal exposure).  I was asked to shoot pictures of the rehearsal itself and while it felt a little awkward (acting like a wedding photographer during the rehearsal) I was doing it at the bride’s request.  Fortunately I was able to get some decent pictures both of the actual rehearsal and of our various family members who were there.

Congratulations to the happy couple!


Gear Bag Review – Domke F-2

So — I finally found a camera bag that I like and am not going to return for a refund.  Mind you, it’s not the perfect bag for all situations (no such bag exists IMO), but it fits my immediate need for a bag to carry some gear in a manner I’m comfortable with.  Bags are such a personal thing but I thought this little review might give someone an idea of what to expect from the Domke F-2.

The type of bag I was searching for was something to carry on photowalks and also transport my camera and a lens or two in the trunk of my car (keep gear from rolling around and be available so I can just grab the bag if I decide to stop and take an impromtu photowalk).  I was also hoping to find a bag which would do double duty and serve as a half-camera/half-general-purpose bag on an upcoming trip to Europe.  Since I’m fortunate enough to live in a city which has a full-blown camera shop (Precision Camera in Austin, TX) I was able to take my gear into the store and try packing it in various bags — that helped eliminate many possibilities up front.  I also had a friend who allowed me to borrow a Kata sling for a month or two.

I ended up really liking the Domke in the store and when I first used it “for real” I just loved it.  The image below shows the bag along with the gear I’ve recently been carrying in it.  I could easily fit more if I chose to stuff every corner.  Please excuse the lousy product shot using on-camera flash and taken with no thought regarding setup or background.

https://michaeltuuk.files.wordpress.com/2010/04/domke_f2_bag.jpg

Domke F-2 Gear Bag

I had the following gear packed in the Domke F-2 with room to spare:

Canon 50D with Sigma 10-20mm and hood
Canon 24-70 f2.8 L with hood
Canon 70-200 f2.8 L with hood – sticks up into the top flap a bit but isn’t problematic
Canon 50 f1.4 with hood
Canon 580EXII in its case
Lens cleaning stuff
Hand strap (for the bag)
Black Rapid RS4 strap
50D manual
coiled flash sync cord
cable shutter release and a wireless remote
batteries, mem cards

Granted, the bag was heavy with those items but they easily fit and I still found the bag easy to work out of.  The shoulder strap is a couple inches wide and is quite comfortable.  Note that I wouldn’t normally carry all that gear but I wanted to put the Domke through its paces.

The bag itself is extremely lightweight and forms to your body.  There are removable inner compartments (velcro) but even when those are used, the outer shell of the bag remains flexible and allows the bag to effectively collapse and shrink into a smaller bag when you don’t stuff it full.  This is a big plus in my book — I don’t like the stiff, permanently-shaped bags.  A downside to this is that there’s no outer padding (just the internal compartments are padded).

The four outer pockets (two in front, one on each end) have no padding whatsoever.  Advantage: pockets collapse small when not used.  Disavantage: if you’re putting delicate items in those pockets you need to be extra careful with your bag.

Zippers…the only zipper on the bag closes the pocket on the inside of the top cover.  I wish there were zippers on a few other pockets because the loose flaps make me a bit nervous that something small might fall out or that someone with a small hand might be able to grab something out unnoticed when in a crowd.  The top cover includes two metal clips in addition to velcro to keep it securely closed.

I’ve tried shoulder/messenger bags, a sling, and backpacks.  Each has certain advantages and disavantages but I found none to my liking before I tried this Domke.  Of course, when it comes time to haul all the camera gear along with a laptop and other items, I’ll be shopping for a second bag and writing a second review…

The Domke is available in a regular canvas material or a waxed canvas.  I chose the wax for a little protection.

Great bag.

[Follow-up: Attended a photo workshop after posting this…both our instructor and another pro in the workshop were carrying this bag]

[Follow-up #2: Lugged this bag all over Paris and London.  Carried my 50D, 10-20mm Sigma, 18-200 Sigma, batteries, cards, etc. and still had plenty of room for maps, my jacket (had to stuff it when both the jacket and camera were in the bag at the same time), phone, water bottle…still love this bag.  I would have liked a shoulder pad for those days I carried the bag for 12+ hours, but the strap is wide enough that it wasn’t really a problem.]