night

The Bean – 2012

Cloud Gate On A Rainy Evening

Cloud Gate On A Rainy Evening

My family and I try to get to downtown Chicago every year and we almost always visit the Cloud Gate (aka “The Bean”) in Millennium Park.  We take goofy pictures in the reflections and pictures of other people taking goofy pictures of themselves.  The shot above was taken at the end of our last visit to Chicago.  It was cold and rainy but we were prepared with jackets, umbrellas, and a rain cover for the camera bag.   The forecast for the day was sunny and warm early, turning to cold and rainy in the afternoon and for once the weatherman was completely correct.  The shots below were only taken 5-ish hours earlier in the day.  I liked how the blown-out sky and top of the bean blend together in the last shot.  Someday I’ll get through all the photos and post some of the goofy ones.

The Bean Earlier In Day

The Bean Earlier In Day

Sky Blends With Sculpture

Sky Blends With Sculpture


The Lone Kite

Lone Kite

I’m not much for the minimalist thing in general but I’ve always liked this picture.  It was taken from the beach — looking inland over the dunes — in Port Aransas, TX.  While swimming and fishing with the kids one evening I happened to look back and see this kite all by itself in the sky.  I’m not sure what else to say other than “I though it was kind of cool”.  Adding to the cool factor IMO was the clear sky.  Normally we photographers like dramatic skies but that would take away from this scene in my estimation.


Happy Independence Day!

Love 24mm, f/13, 20s

I wish I had a photograph with some deep meaning behind it (maybe I’ll come up with one tomorrow), but all I have is this shot taken two years ago.  My wife was out of town over the July 4th holiday so I sent this to her.  This was my 2nd or 3rd try — kind of challenging to write backwards neatly in the air.

Hope all my U.S. friends have a great holiday!


Harbor Hotel At Rowes Wharf

Harbor Hotel Entrance 17mm, f/8, 5 exposures, ISO 100

Sometimes a wide-angle lens isn’t quite wide enough.  I took this shot at the wide end of my 17-40mm lens and it just couldn’t capture it all.  The entrance to this hotel is amazing and is visible from across Boston Harbor (see here).

I used 5 exposures to make this HDR but I honestly could have gotten by with only two or three.  As always I wasn’t trying to eliminate the shadows by using HDR but rather attempting to bring out some depth and tone down some highlights.  Notice that the building on the left out by the harbor just disappears into shadow — that’s how it should be as it really looks that way.  I used Nik HDR Efex Pro to create the starting image, then used a dark exposure to tone down a few of the bright lights.  There was a bit of masking for the couple standing near the left, a couple of tonemapping artifacts fixed up, and basic contrast adjustments.  One thing that bothers me a little is how the lights near the left doorway have quite a green tone while the lights on the right are rather white (I’m a poet and didn’t even know it).  I decided not to balance them out — for whatever reason that’s just the way they were (see original exposure below).

One of the Original Exposures


Honda

Honda 30mm, f/7.1

I’m making arrangements for another trip to Boston and it put in mind some of the photos I took on my last trip.  While taking this photo of the Boston Skyline, a young couple pulled up on a motorcycle, parked it, and walked off to enjoy the view of the skyline across Boston Harbor.  The bike had all sorts of accessory lights which cast a deep reddish-orange glow around it (see below but note the white balance isn’t quite right on the color version).  I took some photos of it and generated this B+W HDR.  There was a bit of noise in the result…I left it in, I kind of like it.


Boston Skyline…Blue Hour

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/7116298547/in/photostream

Boston Skyline At Blue Hour 23mm, f/8, 6 exp, ISO 100

Last weekend, after spending the day touring Boston, I walked across the pedestrian bridge (near the left side of the above image) next to Seaport Blvd which connects downtown to the old seaport district.  The bridge is part of the South Bay Harbor Trail.  I stopped for dinner and waited for the sun to set behind the city.  As I neared this photo spot I found that four photographers were already sitting there — tripods and cameras already set up.  I walked toward them and without a word stopped 10′ in front of them and pretended to set up my tripod.  Silence.  After a few seconds I turned and said I was just kidding and relieved laughter set in.  I asked if it was OK to set up just behind them and they were nice enough to extend an offer to make room in the middle of them if I wanted (I just set up behind and above them).

My intent was to bracket a bunch of exposures as it got darker using f/22 to get a starburst effect.  I switched to f/8 because (1) I really wasn’t getting much of that effect, (2) f/8 is good and sharp, and (3) my exposures were getting longer than 30 seconds and I was too lazy to start timing the exposures manually even though I was using a remote 🙂  White balance was set to daylight.  That’s somewhat arbitrary since I always shoot in RAW but it helps keep things consistent when viewed in the LCD.  I included a couple of straight-out-of-the-camera exposures below so you can see a sample of what I was working with.

On my flight home I plugged six exposures into Nik HDR Efex Pro.  My personal default is to use the realistic-subtle preset as a starting point 99% of the time and I tweak a bit in Nik.  Tweaking and saving complete, I took the Nik output into Photoshop along with a couple of the darker exposures and masked in a few spots which were still over-exposed after the HDR junk.  I toned down the colors in the water and burned the sidewalk darker a bit (more on the dodging and burning below).  Relative to colors, I did want an “HDR look” to this image but I sometimes find the reflections and colors on the water to be a bit overdone for my taste in these skyline shots.  I also dropped the overall saturation by 20 points to bring it back to realistic colors as tools like Nik HDR Efex Pro and Photomatix tend to saturate everything a lot.

Finally, since the perspective wasn’t too bad I decided to fix it by stretching out the top corners a bit and aligning the buildings with rulers to make them more upright on the edges (the SOOC images above do not have that correction).  If you do too big of an edit like this it can degrade the image but it’s fine for this one.  The final image turned out crisp and sharp at high resolution.

This screenshot shows my dodging and burning layer.  A trick I learned watching a Joe Brady video (something about Photoshop for landscapes sponsored by Xrite) is to create a new layer, fill it with 50% gray, then dodge and burn on that with black/white.  There’s no real need for that but the layer gives you a visual to show where you’re doing your adjustments.


Colorful Fish of the Sea, Boston

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Fish of the Sea, Boston 17mm, f/6.3, ISO 200

The sea and seafood are big attractions in Boston and for most of my meals during my visit I’ve tried to get some sort of fish and/or chowder.  Fitting with a seaside theme, I discovered this bit of art near the Boston Harbor Hotel on Atlantic Ave. while walking back to my car the other night.  In hindsight I should have taken a close-up shot of how this was constructed.  Essentially, it was made of a bazillion rough pieces of colored glass / acrylic — rather cool IMO.  I found the colors and the glow on the sidewalk rather interesting as well.  Oddly enough, I had walked right past this in the daylight and didn’t notice it at all.  After dark, however, it was very prominent.  Maybe some of you have seen this before but I hadn’t and that gave me the perfect excuse to post it — something out of the ordinary from Boston.

I used a tone mapped version of the image to get the sidewalk portion then (mostly) masked in the underwater scene from one of the original exposures.  I shot at ISO 200 because with ISO 100 I could never quite complete my exposures before people walked across the scene.  I had a thought to purposely catch passers-by at various shutter speeds but it had been a long day and I was ready to get back to my hotel.  Next time…


Milky Way, Central Texas Skies

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6891294400/in/photostream/lightbox/

Milky Way, Central Texas, 17mm, f/4, 30s, ISO 1600

Our family went on a great camping trip in Central Texas this past weekend.  I woke up at about 5 am on Saturday morning and stepped outside to amazing skies.  I thought to try my hand at some night sky photography but had no idea where my camera, tripod, and wide-angle lens were at the moment.  Of course I was not about to shine a light and go looking for things, especially with our 4-month old soundly asleep.  So, Saturday night I set the appropriate gear out in case I woke up early Sunday morning.  I *did* wake up early and spent a bit of time trying to get some good images of the stars.  I experimented with aperture, shutter speed, and ISO and found some reasonable combinations.  Only later did I hear of the “600 rule” which says that for these night shots you should set your max shutter duration to 600 divided by your focal length if you want to avoid obvious star trails.  My results roughly correlate with that.  A quick internet search yields all sorts of information about night sky photography and post-processing by stacking images…I’ll leave it to you readers to do that research if you’re interested.  I may dig deeper someday myself.

I tried a bit of light painting in an attempt to barely show the trees and add interest to the photo but all I had was a Streamlight brand flashlight (an amazingly bright little pocket flashlight which I highly recommend).  I first of all didn’t want to disturb any campers and then even when I could shine the light away from other campers it was simply too bright to have reasonable control over the exposure.

I believe the glow on the horizon is from San Antonio.  The city is quite far but a long exposure will pick that up quite a bit.  The camera is definitely pointing toward the city.

In the image above you can see a faint shooting star to the lower left of the milky way clouds (kind of tough to see at this size). In the shot below I captured a more obvious shooting star but the overall image is kind of boring.  I did minimal processing on these — noise reduction, slight contrast adjustments.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6894569100/in/photostream/lightbox/

Shooting Star


Party Portrait

My Beautiful Wife 70mm, f/2.8, 1/125s, ISO 3200

Candids are often my favorites and this is no exception for more reasons than one.  This shot was not posed at all unless you count “Please look over here for a second” as posing.  My wife of 25+ years loathes being in front of the camera so I appreciate that she indulged me this time.  There was nothing to bounce flash off of (outdoors, no roof or ceiling overhead, no wall nearby) so I used direct flash with a diffuser.  I started the evening using a 3′ sync cord and holding the flash off-camera at arm’s length but tired of that fairly quickly.  Lightroom was used for most of the processing and for noise reduction (ISO 3200 was used) but I also cloned out a few unattractive elements around the scene.  I didn’t do any skin retouching or the like.


Happy (Belated) Independence Day

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Texas Capitol at Night 65mm, f/22, 1/8s, ISO 400

When we told my sister-in-law — twenty-two-ish years ago — that we were moving to Texas the first thing out of her mouth was, “Oh great, now your kids are going to have big heads!”.  Turns out she was right as most of us pretty much love living in Texas.  Truth be told, we would be happy living anywhere since life is more about the people around you than the place itself.  In fact, not many years ago we passed on an opportunity to move the family to a place my wife had always dreamed of living.  Her words: “This [Austin] is home now.”  The pride of Texans is manifest in many ways.  First, I’ve never been to a state where the state flag flies as much as it does here.  People sport “Native Texan” tattoos and bumper stickers.  Some transplants (not me) display bumper stickers which say “I wasn’t born in Texas but I got here as quick as I could”.

So, March 2nd was Texas Independence Day and I really didn’t plan on posting anything.  However, in the wee hours of this morning — wide awake after a 2 am run to Walgreens for chicken pox relief potions for my son — I found some unprocessed pictures like the one above that I had taken on the way back to my truck after a recent photowalk on the University of Texas campus.

Some brief tidbits: Six national flags have flown over Texas (the origin of the “Six Flags” amusement park name).  They were the Spanish, French, Mexican, Republic of Texas, Confederate, and now the US flag.

Texas is a huge state in land area — far larger than California which is the next largest in the lower 48.  My big Texas head is not so large that I don’t get a good laugh at an Alaskan saying, “We were going to divide Alaska into two states but we didn’t want to make Texas the third largest”.  That’s a pretty good put-down for too-proud Texans IMO 🙂

Texas also has very distinct geographical areas.  When we lived in Illinois we constantly saw TV ads which used a slogan along the lines of “Texas — It’s like a whole other country.”  Frankly, it’s true in many ways.  We grew up equating Texas with tumbleweeds but I probably lived in Texas 15 years before I ever saw one.  The regions range from plains in the north to hill country in the middle to plains and river valleys in the south.  There are piney forests in the east to mountains in the west.  The coastal plains with their fertile black soil are pretty much like the fields in Illinois.

I think we’ll stay a while.