HDR

Colorful Fish of the Sea, Boston

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Fish of the Sea, Boston 17mm, f/6.3, ISO 200

The sea and seafood are big attractions in Boston and for most of my meals during my visit I’ve tried to get some sort of fish and/or chowder.  Fitting with a seaside theme, I discovered this bit of art near the Boston Harbor Hotel on Atlantic Ave. while walking back to my car the other night.  In hindsight I should have taken a close-up shot of how this was constructed.  Essentially, it was made of a bazillion rough pieces of colored glass / acrylic — rather cool IMO.  I found the colors and the glow on the sidewalk rather interesting as well.  Oddly enough, I had walked right past this in the daylight and didn’t notice it at all.  After dark, however, it was very prominent.  Maybe some of you have seen this before but I hadn’t and that gave me the perfect excuse to post it — something out of the ordinary from Boston.

I used a tone mapped version of the image to get the sidewalk portion then (mostly) masked in the underwater scene from one of the original exposures.  I shot at ISO 200 because with ISO 100 I could never quite complete my exposures before people walked across the scene.  I had a thought to purposely catch passers-by at various shutter speeds but it had been a long day and I was ready to get back to my hotel.  Next time…


iPhone 4S — An Amazing Little Camera

iPhone HDR with a few Lightroom edits

I frankly haven’t been very impressed with the  iPhone’s HDR feature until yesterday.  The image at the top was taken with my iPhone 4S with the HDR option turned on, then edited quickly with Lightroom to add some contrast and clarity mainly.  I often try the HDR feature and don’t see a ton of difference.  This time the HDR option just happened to be left on from the last time I’d tried it but as you can see, the results are impressive for a phone camera.

Here are the straight-out-of-the-iphone images:

Non-HDR

Straight-out-of-iPhone HDR


St. John’s Chapel, Tower of London

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St. John's Chapel, Tower of London

There’s something amazing about a building which is still standing after nearly 1000 years.  This is St. John’s Chapel in the White Tower…in the Tower of London.  This image is from 3 handheld exposures — part HDR, part composite.  The dynamic range was extreme here with the dark shadows and the bright light streaming in the windows.


Multiples

The shot above didn’t turn out quite as cool as I’d hoped but it’s fun nonetheless.  While out on a photo walk on the University of Texas campus I set up my camera on my tripod as the photographer crowd gathered on the steps of the UT Tower.  As people milled around I captured shots in a semi-regular cadence.  My idea was to capture people in different positions and mask them together in Photoshop.  When I uploaded my photos to my computer it turned out that I really didn’t capture enough frames.  For example, look at the guy in the red jacket.  He probably wandered all around the scene but in reality I only capture him in a few spots.  There are a couple of people who did appear in widely varied positions around the scene.

The photo above was captured at the base of the UT Tower, a prominent 307-foot building on the University of Texas campus.  A couple other views of the UT Tower are shown below.


Cour Napoleon

Cour Napoleon, The Louvre, Paris

[Update: By popular demand I cropped the original image (which is now at the bottom of the post) to remove the railing.  Once I did that crop, I really felt like the fountain was too close to the edge of the frame so I cropped that out too.  Hated to lose it, but it needed to go.  I also used Lightroom’s healing brush to get rid of a few heads and such which were on the edge of the frame due to the crop.  Finally, I cropped out the top of the sky to get an aspect ratio I liked and added a touch of vignette.  If I were reworking this image I’d probably do some cloning in the sky to make it “fit” better on the edges of the frame but I’m not going to go through that effort for this shot.  Thanks everyone for the input!]

My wife and I are planning a trip this summer with three of our older girls.  We haven’t settled on a destination yet but in the process of thinking about  the upcoming trip I couldn’t help but reminisce about our trip to Paris two years ago.  I would happily go to Paris again — so many things I didn’t get to see last time (and so many I’d like to see again).

I took the shot above (an HDR processed from three handheld exposures) on our first day in Paris.  This one is almost impressionist in feel.  The edges are soft and I only partially masked in some of the ghosted people from the various exposure.  It would be unacceptable as a print but makes a nice, moody image when viewed at the appropriate size (smallish).

Cour Napoleon, Paris


I Miss Her…But Don’t Tell My Wife :-)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/4288119145/

BMW in Black and White 16mm, f/10, ISO 100

A couple of days ago a friend of mine emailed to ask my opinion regarding new tires for his car.  That car — pictured above — was my car and daily ride for four years and his inquiry reminded me of some of the pictures I had taken of it.  I wrote that I was thinking about selling it when I posted this street scene from Paris a couple of years back.  Shortly after that post I did sell it (obviously).  I think I gave my friend a really good deal, but my wife thought we should pay him to take it off our hands.  So, don’t tell her that I miss it!

As for the picture itself, first know that I wasn’t so into my car that I took pictures of it all the time.  Rather, I occasionally used it as a test subject when I wanted to learn something new about photography.  The picture above was taken in my driveway for a dailyshoot.com assignment — “mode of transportation”.  I started out to make a “normal” HDR (if there is such a thing) but bagged that idea.  Here’s what I wrote about it at the time: “Another opportunity to try for a decent shot of the car. From the beginning I intended to make a black and white HDR image so I took bracketed exposures. However, the tonemapped image (from Photomatix) was terrible and I quickly determined that the best image would come from the normal exposure with a few bits and pieces masked in from the over-exposed shot. Still HDR in the manual sense (manual processing), just not tonemapped in Photomatix (or similar software).  Lots of room for improvement but there’s that real job thing…”.  There *are* a few glaring defects in the photo but I like the overall look and decided to post it in spite of those.

For any car buffs out there, this is a 2000 BMW 540i with the six-speed manual transmission and sport package.  I miss the power of the V8, the handling, and the six-speed manual, but not the constant repairs 🙂


Hawaiian Sunburst

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Hawaiian Sunburst 17mm, f/22, 9 exposures, ISO 100

While in Hawaii I managed to catch the sunrise most mornings (not necessarily for pictures).  As the sun rose over this jetty in Kauai I stopped all the way down to f/22 in hopes of getting a nice sunburst — success.  The lens flare effect (real — not added in post) is nice too.  I had hoped to get more interest and/or color out of that rope in the rocks but it doesn’t add much unfortunately.

The image was processed in Nik HDR Efex Pro using 9 exposures.  Lightroom was used for most of the touch-up and then Photoshop was used for curves and noise adjustments.


Texas One And Indivisible

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Texas One And Indivisible 17mm, f/14, ISO 200, 6 exp

Some of my friends are involved in “HDR Tennis” where one of them posts a set of bracketed shots and they all process them in their own way.  Once the processed HDRs are posted the public can vote on their favorites.   All that to say that when the latest HDR Tennis brackets were posted — from the interior of the Texas Capitol building — it reminded me of some bracketed shots I had yet to process.

On the same night I took these shots, I walked inside the Capitol and grabbed some shots inside.  The building is beautiful and one could spend weeks taking a range of pictures from the standard rotunda images to abstracts of fancy railings, floors, windows, door knobs and hinges.  I took a few bracketed sets that I hadn’t done before then had to run off to pick up my daughters nearby.

Both images were processed from 6 exposures in Nik HDR Efex Pro.  Minor tweaks were done in Lightroom after that.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/6782343316/in/photostream

Texas Capitol Extension 17mm, f/8, ISO 100, 6 exp


St. Regis Hotel, Kauai

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St. Regis Hotel, Kauai, Hawaii 17mm, f/16, ISO 200, 8 exposures

I’m posting another HDR that I processed in my Photomatix vs Nik HDR Efex Pro evaluation war.  The subject here is the lobby of the St. Regis Hotel on the Hawaiian island of Kauai.  There was a multi-level water feature (a bit of which you see in this image) which provided all sorts of reflections and begged to be turned into some HDRs.  I didn’t have a tripod with me so I simply plopped the camera down on a ledge and fired of 9 bracket exposures in several locations.  This limited my composition choices but I was able to get the main thing I was after — the reflections in the water.  The hotel is situated in a beautiful spot on the island and commands a gorgeous view the mountains across a small bay.  If I’d had a tripod I would have taken shots from other positions to include a nice view of the ocean and mountains through the windows.

In this case Photomatix was dramatically better for quickly coming up with a result I liked.  The photo above is almost straight out of Photomatix — I only added some clarity/sharpening/noise reduction after that.  Nik gave some interesting results but did a lousy job keeping the clouds outside from being blown out.  Whenever I used the more realistic presets (realistic HDRs are generally my preference) the view out the windows was completely blown out.  No doubt I could have figured out how to get an acceptable result but it was taking a lot of time to begin to match what I got out of the Photomatix effort.

You’ll note the large shift in color cast across the image.  This was due to the prominence of daylight through the windows on the left side versus the interior tungsten lighting on the right.  It bothered me at first but it’s more realistic this way so I decided to leave the color as-is.


Hanalei Valley Lookout

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Hanalei Valley Panorama, Kauai, Hawaii 35mm frames, f/16, ISO 200

Today I’m posting an HDR panorama of the Hanalei Valley in Kauai, Hawaii.  The main crop in the valley is taro. I mentioned in another post that I rarely lugged the tripod around while out with the family but I did usually have it in the car.  When we stopped at this lookout I went ahead and used to capture images for a pano of this valley.  As you can clearly see the dynamic range was quite large, especially with the bright clouds. I quickly picked an exposure (using manual mode) and fired off 3 exposures per position.  I didn’t want to hold the family up so I didn’t take the time to capture the whole dynamic range.  As such, the clouds still are blown out in spots but it’s still a picture worth having from the trip.

I tonemapped each set of brackets using the same settings then used Photoshop to stitch them together.  After that I simply tweaked the contrast.  One obvious improvement would be to clone or crop out the branch sticking into the top left part of the frame but I haven’t yet taken the time…