Misc

Kauai Silhouette

Image

I was experimenting with silhouettes early one morning in Kauai, HI.  The camera was triggered with a wireless shutter release (was thankful I didn’t have to scramble back and forth through the sand and rocks using the self-timer).  I’m sure that someone thinks that there’s only one right way to shoot silhouettes but my preference is to error on the side of slightly overexposing relative to a completely black silhouette.  This varies based on the background but I want to make sure to get enough detail in the non-silhouetted portions of the photo.  Of course I could composite multiple exposures but I find it simpler to use Lightroom and/or Photoshop to reduce the exposure in the appropriate areas to get a complete silhouette if that’s what I’m after.  Often there’s no need for this extra work though — I usually can get I what I want in-camera (I did with this one).  Shooting brackets isn’t a bad idea either if you’re unsure.  The textures were added via OnOne Perfect Photo Suite.

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Longhorn Open 2013

Paola Longoria

Paola Longoria   24mm, f/3.5, 1/800s, ISO 3200

The 2013 Longhorn Open (annual racquetball tournament at the University of Texas) featured the #1 ranked women’s racquetball player in the world, Paola Longoria.  Learn how to consistently hit shots like the one above and you’re one step closer to a #1 ranking.  I decided to take a few pictures on the final day of the tournament — just to see how they’d turn out.  I shot in manual mode and played around with the balance between aperture (depth of field), shutter speed (freezing the players and the ball), and high ISO (noise considerations).  The lighting was actually pretty good in most of the courts, allowing “reasonable” settings.  Most of the courts didn’t have any viewing area except from above.  That isn’t so great for pictures but I was just experimenting anyway.  Focusing was another challenge and I frankly never figured out a good strategy.


Family Tradition

Our Traditional Family Christmas Portrait   35mm, f/8, 1/40

Our Traditional Family Christmas Portrait 35mm, f/8, 1/40

It’s only the second year we’ve taken this photo, but we’re calling it a tradition anyway.  We once again piled wrapping paper on ourselves and snapped a family photo.  No one is posed — “sit down, grab some wrapping paper, and smile at the camera”.  I used f/8 to get sufficient(ish) depth of field and the lighting is simply an on-camera flash bounced up and behind the camera.  I have a wireless remote but used the self-timer for this shot (I had forgotten to get the remote out and everyone was just ready to get the pic done and go make breakfast).  I ended up having to photoshop a new version of myself and one of my daughters into the shot — that’s standard operating procedure in our family shots it seems.


One More Sleep ‘Til Christmas

Christmas Portrait

Christmas Portrait

Our traditional Christmas Eve consists of consuming a meal of assorted sausages, cheeses, and crackers while watching Muppet Christmas Carol.  We always have a fire going in the fireplace no matter the weather — it’s usually cool enough.  The final hidden presents are wrapped and placed around the Christmas tree and all go to bed with great anticipation.

This year my wife had Christmas pajamas for all the “littles” (some of which are growing to be “middles”).  She asked me to take a photo of the kids just before bedtime and the result is shown above.  I shot from (roughly) the kids’ eye level and used either manual or shutter-priority mode (can’t remember) with a 1/4 CTO gel’ed flash bounced off the wall/ceiling behind me.  In the upper left hand corner you can see the well-lit wall reflected in our glass doors.  Had this been a more “official” shot I would have switched angles, bounced the flash over my other shoulder, etc. in order to minimize the bright reflections.  The littlest one only has so much patience though so we to fire off some shots and call it a day.


Fall Decorations

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/8173664847/in/photostream

Fall Decor 50mm, f/1.4, 1/1000s

We had yet another perfect weather day here in Texas — it’s been an awesome fall.  The middle of November and it was somewhere around 80 degrees.  The morning was a crisp 60-ish which was perfect for a run.  Despite not having the same type of seasons as we did where I grew up in the Midwest, I still think of fall or autumn in the same way and it still reminds me of fall colors (we get a *little* of that) and fall decorations.

My mom is a master of outdoor gardening and decoration.  The picture above shows a typical decoration she would make for the house.  This one adorned her outdoor shed.  Others like it were mixed in with all the decorations around her house.

Going for the extreme bokeh (love the colors in this photo) I used my 50mm lens at f/1.4.  The focus distance was relatively close which adds to the effect.  Often the bokeh in shots with the 50mm (the Canon f1.8 and f/1.4 at least) can be a bit ragged for lack of a better term.  In other words it doesn’t usually come out silky smooth like you’d get with a 70-200mm lens at f/2.8.  However, it turned out pretty good here.


Hey, Take My Picture!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/8143068737/in/photostream/

Hey, Take My Picture

A friend and I bought photo passes to the Wings Over Houston Air Show last weekend.  The folks in Houston really do it right too.  The photo pit was right on the flight line, roomy, and had a great riser platform to get well above the fence.  They provided coffee in the morning, soft drinks and lunch — even sunscreen.  Well done.

It’s easy to go crazy at an air show and fill up a half-dozen memory cards.  From the sounds of the shutters around us I think some guys did that in fact.  Eight to ten frames per second, firing away every time a plane was in sight.  My friend and I were much more conservative in our shots.  I came home with barely more than a card full of shots.  It’s nice to not have so many photos to go through when I got home.

The shot above is Major Henry “Schadow” Schantz, pilot for the F-22 Demonstration and Heritage Flight team (more on the Heritage Flight some other time).  It was pretty cool being right next to the plane as it went by and getting a nod (and a finger-point) from the pilot.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/8143101190/in/photostream/


Da Bears!

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Monday Night Football

I had no idea until now that I haven’t posted in almost two months…I have had zero time for photography and blogging…for all sorts of reasons.  I knew it had been a “long time” but not this long.  I finally log in to WordPress and find some of the formatting changed, all sorts of cool posts from others that I’ve managed to miss, and oddly enough — I’m getting more hits on the blog than when I left (not that I’m all into that, but it’s interesting nonetheless). My top posts every week are still the Domke F2 review and the Hill Country Wedding.  Interesting.

Having grown up a Chicago Bears fan I jumped on the opportunity to go to the Bears vs. Cowboys game last week Monday.  Given the insane cost I’m not likely to do that again anytime soon unless I win the lottery…and I don’t play the lottery.  It was a fun time with my son, daughter, and some friends.

The picture I’m posting today was taken with the trusty Canon S90 that I purchased from my friend Mike Connell.  Yeah, I know there’s almost nothing related to the Bears in the photo except that this is where they were playing…oh well.  I’m finding the S90 pretty handy for situations like this — where I either don’t want to lug a big camera around or they aren’t allowed yet I still want some manual control over the exposures.  Cowboys Stadium has a 3″ lens rule so I’m sure I could have brought my DSLR in with certain lenses.  However, I don’t want to risk the hassle of walking up with a DLSR and being told mine isn’t allowed — then what?  Argue with them and maybe win but if I lose I have to haul it back to the car, risk having people see me lock it up in the car, etc.  The S90 will do just fine…


Beep, Beep

Let Me In?

For several weeks now we’ve had a road runner showing up on our back porch.  The first few times it showed up it went around finding dried cicada shells (or whatever they are) and eating something out of them.  There aren’t any more shells around that I have seen but the road runner still shows up here and there.  Today it walked right up to the back door and peered in.  We have two sets of sliding doors in the back and as the road runner walked between them (out of view) I grabbed the camera off the table — I had left it there after snapping some pics of my daughter yesterday.  I managed to get in position before the road runner was back in view and when it showed up at the other door I was able to take some pictures without scaring it off.

The backlight was really bad and the reflections on the glass caused some greenish weirdness but if you’ve ever been around road runners you know they’re very skittish and you don’t get them looking in your back door every day.  I was grateful to snag a few pics regardless of the quality.


The Crew

20120728_WoodBurning

The Crew

We recently had visitors and it was a good opportunity for the kids and their visiting friends to have some fun making fires.  Fire, chainsaws…fun stuff indeed.  We were sure to capture some pictures of them together since they live 1000+ miles away and don’t get to visit often.  I used the tripod and wireless remote to get the group shot above.  They were supposedly going for the serious look in the photo below but they never could manage it.

The image above is actually a crop of a larger Brenizer pano that I attempted.  It would’ve been a cool Brenizer except that the smoke in the background varied so much as the individual frames were being taken.  That led to some odd-looking stuff in the final stitch (some of which is actually evident, but not too obvious, in the photo above).  Little puffs of smoke blurred the image in some (small) places which looked rather unnatural.  I didn’t bother saving that larger view.

For safety reasons we keep the fires small and don’t constantly add new “fuel” to them.  This gives the kids plenty of time for play and exploration — they have a blast out there.  There are imaginary forts under the trees, deer tracks to follow, scorpions to find under rocks, and snakes to (pretend you want to) find.  We haven’t run across any rattlers or coral snakes at our place yet but they’re certainly around.  Fortunately I’ve only seen them dead on the road when I’m out running rather than live in the yard.


Chair Abstract

Chair Abstract 50mm, f/1.4, 1/50s, ISO 200

Just like the kite photo I recently posted, this image is out of the ordinary for me — I don’t shoot many abstract or fine art types of photos.  During the week I picked up my Canon 5D mkii from being repaired [related sad story below] and yesterday got a chance to fully check it out.  I popped my 50mm f/1.4 lens on the body and started plinking.  As I sat at our little breakfast table I opened the lens up completely and started shooting through the rails of one of the chair backs.  There were a lot of colorful things in the background which were nicely blurred by the wide aperture and close focus distance.  I then started shooting while moving the camera up and down, resulting in the image above.  I rather like it.  The image is straight out of the camera except for cropping.

So the sad story is this:  This year I decided to try shooting some pictures at a fireworks show.  I’d never done it — I’d rather concentrate on *watching* the fireworks and it just seemed like a headache overall.  Before the fireworks we attended a BBQ dinner catered by the Salt Lick and as dusk fell I hauled out the camera and tripod and began getting set up.  I put my wireless remote into the cameras hot shoe, put the camera on the tripod, then proceeded to adjust the length of the tripod legs.  I heard a loud crash — my 5D mkii hitting the pavement from a height of about 5 feet.  Looking on the bright side, the camera had turned over on the way down and landed flat on the wireless remote which was in many pieces all around us.  That definitely spared me from the damage I could have had.  The camera “worked” here and there but mostly gave an error.  It would even randomly try to focus the lens — when the power switch was off!  Anyway…a couple hundred dollars later I have my camera back refurbished and sporting a new shutter box and mirror assembly.  I managed to put all the remote pieces together but it was dead as a doornail.