Using Only The Good Exposures For HDR

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5397124916/

Landscape Waterfall

Desperate to do *something* photography-related I was going through some old bracketed exposures.  I had the thought of looking through old exposures after reading Mike Criswell’s (aka Theaterwiz) blog (see this post: http://theaterwiz.wordpress.com/2011/01/13/rust-never-sleeps/).

I came across some brackets for this man-made waterfall I shot in TN a long time back and decided to do a little processing to see what look I could bring out in the rocks.  I noticed that the center exposure was nearly a perfect exposure in the sense that almost nothing was blown out or unexposed.  I decided to try tonemapping two versions — one using the two lighter exposures and one using all three exposures.  After tonemapping each with the same settings, I processed them exactly the same way:  blended the tonemapped layer with Topaz adjusted version of that layer at 50% opacity, added a saturation adjustment layer with +6 for the saturation, and a slight s-curve adjustment layer.

It’s very subtle and you may not really even be able to see much difference here on the blog, but the image using only two exposures has better color and contrast.  The part of the image where the waterfall hits the rocks is more pleasing as well.  Now, I could easily process the “poorer” image further and make it look almost exactly like the two-exposure version — mask in original exposures to get the water looking how I want and adjust color and contrast.  However, no need for that if I start by tonemapping only the exposures which provide useful information.  That turned out to be two exposures for this image — maybe I should call it MDR for “medium dynamic range”.  Here’s the 3-exposure version.  I don’t think you’ll see the difference on the blog but included it anyway for those of you with a discerning eye.

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5398946935/

Same Waterfall using Three Exposures

One might point out that possibly I didn’t choose a good center point to start with but in this case a brighter exposure wouldn’t have been useful either as I really don’t want to bring out any more details in the shadows.  It was an overcast day and, if it weren’t for the brightness of some of the water, a single exposure would have done the trick.

Anyway, I thought this quick experiment mildly interesting and thought I’d share it.  I was going to make a fancy split image thing for you compare side-by-side but it just isn’t dramatic enough to make the effort 🙂

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4 responses

  1. Nice work on the experimentation! I really like this shot, man…the detail in the glistening rocks is just fantastic!

    February 3, 2011 at 9:13 am

  2. The rocks do look good, nice work!

    February 3, 2011 at 10:29 am

  3. Yeah, those rocks are sweet! Jim

    February 3, 2011 at 5:35 pm

  4. Pingback: How Many Exposures For An HDR? « Michael Tuuk Photography

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