Posts tagged “united kingdom

Take the Shot Anyway

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/5201563273/

All Hallows by the Tower

Sometimes you find yourself in a photographic situation where you don’t have a good shot.  You may not be able to find a good angle, there may not be enough light (and you don’t have a tripod), or you may not have your preferred lens on hand.  Many purists would tell you not to take a shot if it isn’t a perfect situation but in this digital age I don’t buy into that.

If the angle or framing isn’t just what you want, try it anyway.  You may very well find something (a certain crop for example) in post-processing which actually works.  “Do everything in-camera” is a great idea but some take it nearly to the point of “if you can’t do it in-camera, don’t do it at all”.  For pros it surely makes business sense as they are very sensitive to efficiency in their work.  However, I disagree that it should be a black-and-white mantra for everyone.  I say take the shot and throw it away if it’s clear you can’t do anything with it later.  It *is* a bit of a pain to cull the day’s shoot when there are a lot of pics, but I’ve found it worth it to take extra shots most of the time.  That said, I don’t want to give the impression that I fire away blindly — there are lots of shots that I pass up because I don’t think the situation measures up.

The shot above was one that I almost didn’t take but it’s one that I personally enjoy seeing come up on my screensaver and background regularly.  First, it reminds me of a great trip to Europe with my wife.  Secondly, I “just like it” — quiet, somber scene of a couple worshippers, impressive stone walls, beautiful wooden pews.  The light was tricky — very bright from the windows, very dark in the shadows.  I had no tripod and wasn’t going attempt to get 6-ish (minimum) handheld exposures for an HDR or composite.  So, I just took the shot.  The exposure was 1/4s but with the wide angle (10mm) it turned out relatively good.  Sure, the windows and floor are blown out but I wasn’t after a nice architectural shot after all.

The location is All Hallows by the Tower Church in London.  It claims to be the oldest church in London (a claim which I have no reason to dispute) having been established in 675 AD (!).  My wife and I popped in there after touring the Tower of London.  Much of the church has been reconstructed over time for reasons of expansion and damage but it still retains a doorway from the 600s.  Cool place.  My wife and I were two of the five people in the church (us, two in the pews, and a caretaker/receptionist of sorts).  That was a refreshing difference from the crowds at places like Notre Dame and St. Sulpice.


The Great Court

http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeltuuk/4943396371/

The Great Court 10mm, f4.5, 1/500s nominal

During my not-a-photo-trip to Paris and London this past spring I still managed some interesting (IMO) shots.  This image taken in the Great Court inside the British Museum has been one of my favorites from the standpoint of its composition and the contrast of the blues and greens against the drab-ish stone.  Again, that’s just my opinion of course.

I’ve had difficulty processing this image, however.  I really wanted to process as an HDR and the three original handheld exposures were extremely difficult to line up properly.  I’ve noted that when shooting wide angles a slight bit of movement and/or rotation between exposures makes a huge difference.  Because of this, Photomatix did a very poor job of alignment and this left a lot of ghosting in the image.  Of course, I had the ability to mix the tonemapped image with the original exposures but it was proving to be a lot of work to tweak pieces of each layer to line up with the section I wanted to mask it into.  It also took more work than usual to get the original exposures looking just right in order to match the main image.  I pushed the texture and HDR-ishness farther than I normally do…just because it seems to work here.

One mistake that I couldn’t overcome was the fact that the light coming through the glass roof was blown out in all the exposures.  I call that a “mistake” but I really wasn’t taking the time to think through all the shots because I was doing very well at keeping the trip about time with my wife, not about photography.  Heath O’Fee has a good post about mistakes like this by the way — they don’t always ruin the shot [Here’s the link: http://yycofee.wordpress.com/2010/08/30/mistakes/].

Well, there it is — one of *my* favorite images.


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